Latest Digg Payola Exposed!

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Thanks to my friend and top Digg user #6 Karim Yergaliyev (supernova17), we bring to you the latest edition of ‘Digg Payola Exposed!’
Note: I replaced the email addresses to reflect the Digg user names of the individuals that received the email.
>From: Alex Hunter <wealthymarketer@googlemail.com>
>
>Date: Feb 1, 2007 1:37 PM
>
>Subject: Hey Fellow Digg User… I need a favour
>
>To: digitalgopher, CLIFFosakaJAPAN, aaaz, gwjc, supernova17, chrisek, BloodJunkie, miekuel, aidenag, dirtyfratboy

>
>Hello,
>
>I need a favor. I run a website bringpopcorn.com.
>
>Would you get my website to the Digg first page, and if successful I’ll pay $500.
>
>The site is of interest to most Digg users anyhow, it’s just people only listen to top Digg users.
>
>If interested please email back.
>
>Alex
The biggest mistake you can make as a content producer is to try and pay the top community members to submit/promote your content. If you truly believe that the content is of interest to the community, as Mr. Hunter does, then you are much better of either submitting the content yourself, or waiting for someone to submit it naturally.
The same user was also recently banned from Netscape.com for using more than 20 fake accounts to artificially promote his content to the home page of the site.
The overall purpose of this article is to show that you should not be paying people for Digg submissions, but instead you should be trying to provide value to the Digg community. If you can provide value to the community you will be able to create buzz and potentially have a successful product.

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