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Sayonara Google Wave!

Remember Google Wave? I know you all do. It’s one of Google’s biggest and most ambitious project which was launched to the public back in 2009.  Let me refresh you’re memory – Google Wave is an online, real-time collaboration tool. It was a promising product which many failed to appreciate, especially the non-tech savvy online users. Why? Because it’s too complex for a real-time messaging tool.

So, finally Google will stop supporting or developing Google Wave. No future development will be carried out. Although Google Wave will not be totally shut down, well at least until the end of 2010. Google has these words to say:

We don’t plan to continue developing Wave as a standalone product, but we will maintain the site at least through the end of the year and extend the technology for use in other Google projects. The central parts of the code, as well as the protocols that have driven many of Wave’s innovations, like drag-and-drop and character-by-character live typing, are already available as open source, so customers and partners can continue the innovation we began. In addition, we will work on tools so that users can easily “liberate” their content from Wave.

So, what are your thoughts? Are you saddened by Google Wave’s sudden demise?

 Sayonara Google Wave!
Arnold Zafra writes daily on the announcements by Google, Ask.com, Yahoo & MSN along with how these announcements effect web publishers. He is currently building three niche blogs covering iPad News, Google Android Phones and E-Book Readers.
 Sayonara Google Wave!

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4 thoughts on “Sayonara Google Wave!

  1. I'm actually sad to see it go- it had great potential in an area that greatly is lacking. I think the market is small for collaboration software so the backlash to it was huge. Most of the people complaining never would use it anyway.

  2. But most people complaining complained that it was pointless and had no real use, so they were valid complaints.

  3. Seems to me a failure in launch strategy. Why launch a collaboration tool and then control so tightly who can use it? Half the people I wanted to collaborate with couldn't get invited to it, even after we went them multiple invites. Would it still have crashed and burned? Probably. But it might have had a fighting chance if more people had been able to get access to it.

  4. Irritated about this, as I used Wave extensively from Sept 2009 onwards. The real point is that Google has ensured that people will not adopt their next innovation without waiting to see if it actually takes hold. Why get attached to something new if its gets yanked so quickly after launch.