Online Reputation Management

Reactive Reputation Management, Reclaim Your Search Rankings: Interview With Mitchell Wright

A big thanks to our Pubcon 2013 sponsor, Brand.com: “the #1 rated online reputation management company”.

In an interview conducted at Pubcon 2013 in Las Vegas, Mitchell Wright of OnlineRepManagement.com leads a discussion about reactive reputation management.

What do you do if someone maliciously publishes negative content about you and your brand? Even worse, what do you do if their negative content ends up with a higher search ranking for your personal name and your brand name?

This is a nightmare that no website owner ever wants to experience, but it helps to be prepared. Mitchell explains what to do in the video below:

Here are some key takeaways from the video:

  • If this happens to you, Mitchell says the first thing you should do address the issue in any way possible. Mitchell recommends pushing out lots of positive press.
  • Ideally you want to overpower that negative publicity with positive publicity. You can do this with positive press releases and positive reviews.
  • Proactively speaking you want to own the conversation around your brand to prevent the negative content from surfacing.
  • You can do this by being active on social media and facilitating positive mentions by responding to customer questions and concerns.
  • Most of the time an issue gets blown out of proportion because the customer never received a response from the company.
  • Being proactive in your customer service can save you a lot of headaches down the road.

If you have any questions after watching the video, for either myself or Mitchell, ask them in the comments section and we will do our best to respond to everyone! Please visit SEJ’s YouTube page for more video interviews from Pubcon 2013.

 

 Reactive Reputation Management, Reclaim Your Search Rankings: Interview With Mitchell Wright

John Rampton

President at Adogy
Editor-at-Large John Rampton is an entrepreneur, full-time computer nerd, and PPC expert. President at Adogy. I enjoy helping people and am always online to chat +/@johnrampton
 Reactive Reputation Management, Reclaim Your Search Rankings: Interview With Mitchell Wright

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4 thoughts on “Reactive Reputation Management, Reclaim Your Search Rankings: Interview With Mitchell Wright

  1. Hi John,
    Thanks for the Tips. I’m Working the same ‘Online Reputation Management’ , i need to push down one negative YouTube Video for my brand. While searching my brand on Google the negative video is on the second. I have done some works like
    1) Choose one video and change the title, description, tags related to my brand
    2) Comment related videos with my YouTube profile daily
    3) Get more comments on my chosen video from different peoples and respond to their question via comments
    4) Do follow links build for my brand name targeting my chosen YouTube video
    5) Bookmarking, forum participation, guest-posting done for the brand keyword targeting my you tube video

    But still the negative YouTube video is ranking. what else i have to do now? But i never try positive press release what is that?
    Kindly give some ideas to push down the negative YouTube videos

    Thanks in Advance

    1. Hi Olivier,

      Have you ever tried reporting the negative video? There is a checklist that pops up with the reason you’re reporting it. If they’re bashing your brand directly, you can mark the video as “Spam or misleading,” especially if they’re purposefully slandering your brand’s name.

      If that doesn’t seem to work, try the legal route through the “Infringes my rights” option. And if that doesn’t work either, I suppose you can try what Mitchell and John were talking about: positive posts.

      The idea is to post and share more videos that link back to your brand’s name than the person who’s perpetuating the negative one. The idea is that since those videos will be more fresh and current than the negative one, you’ll essentially “flush back” that negative one. That’s how Google is indexing content now. The more updated and current the better.

      Make sense?