SEO

The SERP Value of Repurposing & Sub-Domaining Email Newsletter Content

SEO experts know well that repurposing email newsletter content is more than just slapping it up on some blog or website while hoping that it ranks and you don’t get bitten by the Google SERPent. The most effective way to post content which has already appeared in an email newsletter is to essentially rewrite it so that the subscriber who happens to read the same basic content on your website does not see the value of your newsletter diluted.

After all, what’s the point in subscribing to an “exclusive & elite” email newsletter if the valuable tips are available to anyone on a public site? However, there are other SEO advantages which may be obtained via the metamorphosis of email newsletter content and some relate directly to Google Panda/Farmer.

Repurposed newsletter content is SEO Google Gold

Repurposing email newsletter content is both an art and a science. Part of the science is being able to adequately reword each sentence while retaining the essence of the original. Part of the art is in ensuring that the rewritten article reads as smoothly as if it had been written originally in this manner. A very popular form of email newsletter content is the Top X List of tips for this, that, or the other thing.

When rewriting this type of article you can’t just parrot the same list, so the recommended strategy is to take each numbered tip and turn it into a paragraph rather than a bullet list, and mixing up the order. You might also want to leave a couple of the “hottest” tips out and reserve them exclusively for your loyal subscribers.

It is also highly advisable that you soften up the hard sell within the content, as many newsletters are dedicated to promoting the call to action to the detriment of just about everything else. The resultant article is not only SEO Google Gold, but it’s also different enough from your email newsletter content that your subscribers won’t cry foul.

Sub-Domaining spikes SERPs

The Google Panda/Farmer algorithm shift was the equivalent of a tsunami in the SEO world. Virtually overnight, a number of high ranking sites in the Alexa Top 500 disappeared beneath the waves. Hubpages was one of the sites hit hardest by the Google Panda/Farmer algorithm change, and it took them several months to figure out that they could regain some of their lost SERPs by breaking up their site into thousands of sub-domains.

Each of the many writers on Hubpages now has their own domain: janedoe.hubpages.com. In just days from implementing, this rainbow of sub-domains SERPs and traffic increased measurably. What the Hubpages restructuring does not take into consideration is the subject matter which each writer may be discussing. If a writer is blogging about motorcycles, computers, and cats, there is still ample lost opportunity for SERP optimization, calling for possibly a further sub-domaining: motorcycles.janedoe.hubpages.com would be thus differentiated from cats.janedoe.hubpages.com.

Any content category can be a sub-domain

Let’s assume that you issue three email newsletters based on the type of white hat SEO strategies you implement:

  • Internal & Reciprocal Linking
  • Website Optimization
  • Content Creation & Placement

Once you’ve adequately rewritten the content, you can place it into specific sub-domains such as:

  • linking.supercalifragialisticseo.com
  • optimization.supercalifragialisticseo.com
  • content.supercalifragialisticseo.com

What Google’s indexing bots will see is nicely structured subdomains each containing high quality, unique content which is laser focused for specific topics, and “should” reward it accordingly.

A constant in the ever-changing rules

The only constant in the SEO universe is that the rules change all the time. By repurposing and rewriting your email newsletter content and segregating each overall topic into its own sub-domain you may not be able to assure #1 position on every keyword under the sun in perpetuity, but you certainly will be harnessing a capable and powerful way to keep providing Google and your readers with high value content.

 The SERP Value of Repurposing & Sub Domaining Email Newsletter Content
Hal Licino is a veteran freelance writer, book author and frequent contributor to a blog hosted by Benchmark Email, one of the world’s global email marketing solutions.

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2 thoughts on “The SERP Value of Repurposing & Sub-Domaining Email Newsletter Content

  1. Nice tips. I must confess, I am guilty of not doing a complete rewrite of newsletters, or taking out a couple of the best tips from lists. But in regard to the sub-domain tip. What if you don’t have control, or can’t produce more than one level of sub-domains? For example, if I was writing about cars and I can’t make a URL like this: focus.ford.cardomain.com, but only a URL like this: ford.cardomain.com. Do you suggest doing a sub-folder instead like this: ford.cardomain.com/focus. Just curious on your idea. Thanks.

  2. “soften up the hard sell within the content”

    If you are going to be turning a newsletter into an article or blog post or something similar, I think that is very important to remember. You don’t want to turn your blog into another advertising space for your products, but rather focus on educating the consumer.