SEO

Reasons To Not Blog Using Blogger or Blogspot

If you use Google Blogger to produce your blog or host your Blogger blog on Blogspot, this could happen to you :

blogger1 Reasons To Not Blog Using Blogger or Blogspot

This week I attended a Blogger MeetUp which I set up in the Tampa Bay area to meet and get to know other bloggers. I found the MeetUp to be a success and hope to work with others to grow the networking of bloggers in this area. One major question by an attendee was about where to host a blog and the difference between Blogspot, WordPress and hosting blogs on your own domain.

My answer to the question was not SEO oriented, but moreso ownership and control of content oriented. Basically, if you host your blog on Google’s Blogspot or use Blogger; you are giving Google the right to control and access your content and information. Even shut down your blog when they see fit to do so.

Google may, in its sole discretion, at any time and for any reason, terminate the Service, terminate this Agreement, or suspend or terminate your account. In the event of termination, your account will be disabled and you may not be granted access to your account or any files or other content contained in your account although residual copies of information may remain in our system for some time for back-up purposes.

There are a lot of ‘professional bloggers’ using Google’s Blogger platform and Google’s Blogspot hosting and doing so takes away the heart of your blog and hands it over to Google. They control your blog, not you.

Let’s take a look at the Blogger Terms of Service for more detail, shall we?

  • General Practices Regarding Use and Storage. You agree that Google has no responsibility or liability for the deletion of, or the failure to store or to transmit, any Content and other communications maintained by the Service. Google retains the right to create limits on use and storage at our sole discretion at any time with or without notice.
  • Google also reserves the right to access, read, preserve, and disclose any information as it reasonably believes is necessary to (a) satisfy any applicable law, regulation, legal process or governmental request, (b) enforce this Agreement, including investigation of potential violations hereof, (c) detect, prevent, or otherwise address fraud, security or technical issues, (d) respond to user support requests, or (e) protect the rights, property or safety of Google, its users and the public.
  • By submitting, posting or displaying Content on or through Google services which are intended to be available to the members of the public, you grant Google a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license to reproduce, publish and distribute such Content on Google services for the purpose of displaying and distributing Google services. Google furthermore reserves the right to refuse to accept, post, display or transmit any Content in its sole discretion.
Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM Reasons To Not Blog Using Blogger or Blogspot
Loren Baker is the Founder of SEJ, an Advisor at Alpha Brand Media and runs Foundation Digital, a digital marketing strategy & development agency.
Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM Reasons To Not Blog Using Blogger or Blogspot

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35 thoughts on “Reasons To Not Blog Using Blogger or Blogspot

  1. This is among one of the main reasons why I self-host – control over content that is mine.

    You can find hosting that is cheap enough to accommodate any budget, and a community of bloggers and developers that spreads wide enough, that hosting your own and figuring out how to do it is as simple as 1,2,3.

  2. Excellent article Loran. As blogging continues to grow in popularity and more and more bloggers are born, people should really carefully consider the options that are best for them and the overall long-term health and control of their intellectual property, which in this case is uniquely written and published content on the Internet.

    I can only imagine how I would feel after discovering that my two years of publishing over 700 articles on my blog were instantly wiped out.

  3. I use blogger….just because I was using it for another purpose and then started my AdWords Blog using it to save some $. I get some great SEO traffic from my blog where it is now…not sure if Google “favors” certain blogspot blogs…

  4. This is a great post. I have been with Blogger since 2006 and started there simply because I was totally ignorant to blogging and blog hosts at the time. I’ve kept it there this long because I wasn’t blogging enough to where I felt it mattered that much. Now that I have started blogging on a fairly regular basis I am planning to switch over to self hosted blogging within the week. I was planning on doing so before readign this, but knowing this makes my decision that much easier. :)

  5. Blogger.com is to be thanked for enabling the blogging revolution. After that, however, it ceased to provided additional functionality.

    I don’t know how they’ve kept attracting users without even offering simple things like pagination! The Blogger template tags are a mess.

    WordPress is the best choice.

  6. Thank You Loren for bringing this to the forefront. Many people, especially small business owners want to get started quickly blogging and may not take the time to read the fine print.

  7. I’ve been using Blogger for a long time now, and have never heard of a Blogger user having their blog suddenly deleted!

    Those who violate Blogger’s terms of service may be suspended from posting until the problem has been resolved. They will receive an email warning about this, and also a message in their Blogger dashboard.

    Blogger doesn’t own the content of a blog (which can be read in the terms and conditions).

    The image at the top is seen often when a user decides to delete their own blog. Their Blogspot URL is reserved for them to reuse at any time they choose to do so.

    I do wish that Blogger didn’t attract so much bad press! Many of us enjoy using this platform (which incidentally is free, requires no set-up or maintanance, updates or paid hosting).

    There are good and bad points of every blogging platform, whether self hosted or not.

  8. Loren – I use both Blogger and WordPress for different projects. For those who are concerned about this, WordPress will allow you to import (even huge) Blogger blogs, thereby maintaining a back-up and copy of your work.

  9. (1) if u violate copyright law, then your blog hosting provider also reserve the rights to disclose u r details.
    (2) pubishing copyrighted or unauthorized content can also be deneleted by your web hosting provider with out any nofification to website owner.
    3. this point is valid one that why google want to reproduce or republish blogger conetnt. this thing will not happen with self hosted blog or website.

  10. I have been using Blogger since 2005 and found it not very user friendly. Since Google bought it over, every thing has got worse and gone to the dogs. Not enough money has been allocated for customer service.

    It is true that many bloggers have been locked out recently for imaginary TOS infringements. I have not heard of any lost of personal information due to deletion of blogs

    As a free service, world wide, Blogger is doing fine. I have no intention to move to WordPress or any where else.

    David Chin
    Hamilton, NZ.

  11. On an SEO basis, I generally disagree with using a blog service like blogger.

    The whole point of blogging for SEO is to get links to YOUR domain. If you use blogspot then people will link to the blogspot domain. So your website gets no SEO value accredited to it.

    If you host it on your own domain though, then the links will point to your domain which is far better in my opinion.

  12. I started out on Blogger, but quickly switched over to WordPress, and my own hosting. Blogger was too restrictive and offered very few features. Glad I did, as it sounds like you’re pretty much giving Google all of your content if you host on blogspot.

    Blogger is a great free service for personal blogs, but in a professional environment, where you need full control over content, always host your own. That way if anything goes wrong on your blog (files get messed up) you aren’t relying on Google to fix it for you.

  13. Blogger is OK for modest blogs with no breakout potential. Operative concept being “free.”

    I have blogs on Blogger, TypePad and WordPress (my own hosting).

    I think WordPress is terrific in theory, good in practice.

    Sometimes simple things involve trolling for help on the forum, using dicey applications that conflict with your version of the software, that sort of thing. Then there are the rolling version updates, which are billed as simple but can go quite wrong if you’re not careful. There are a lot of updates.

    TypePad, on the other hand, is good for people without html skills. Their templates allow for a lot of variation (unlike Blogger) and they continue to upgrade their offerings.

    But … Their recent content panel upgrade has been a mess. Many obvious bugs but they went live. I hate using it. If you know basic html it is just adding work and hassle in my opinion.

    The other big problem with TypePad is, if you get into hundreds of posts Google will knock you down in the SERPs for duplicate meta data.

    TypePad’s solution: Don’t use meta data.

    Or go to “advanced pages,” which means your own coding and you might as well be self-hosted with WordPress. This includes title tags, so any SEO efforts on that platform are DOA.

    TypePad has a terrific searchable help system but their email support is hit or miss. Often, they don’t seem to read the email or understand anything remotely complicated. They can be quite condescending.

    As for the duplicate meta data problem with Google, they have been aware of this for at least a year and a half and have done nothing. Can you imagine?

    Also, they offer only limited 301 redirects, so you’re in for a year of chasing down your incoming links if you defect.

    I agree with Seth Grodin, who has said signing up with TypePad was his biggest error starting out as a blogger.

    If you anticipate any level of success, go with WordPress and self-hosting.

    1. This was a great post!! I also am glad you mentioned Seth Grodin. I follow him too and the thing I was trying to figure out was why he went with Typepad because I know he is in the mix when it comes to marketing and business. Also, maybe I should rethink my subscription with Feedblitz (his rss feeder). I guess I will play with them for a little while longer. Very difficult interface to use but perhaps I should give it some more time to learn the platform. Again great post!

  14. (Liz) Right, not on WordPress. There are other ways of getting into Dutch on WP, detailed many places on the Web. Check into SEO plugins for WP and be sure to set the permalinks off the ugly default.

    I just upgraded to the latest version of WP and like it a lot. Others have not been so enthused.

  15. Content sharing with Google
    Not SEO friendly like WP

    Are some of the negative thoughts against Blogger.com. But I suggest using blogger.com via FTP in your own customized domain name.

    I suggest blogger.com only for the following reasons,

    1. No need to buy any storage space or database to use blogger via FTP
    2. It is SEO friendly; you need to study the coding properly to do it
    3. Since it is from Google there are chances of getting good traffic via that blog

    Still i am not able to understand why people don’t use the free FTP blogging service from Blogger.com in their own domain names.

  16. @Software Testing – I strongly disagree about Blogger.com’s SEO friendliness, even with the FTP Blogger option, getting a Blogger blog to be anywhere near WordPress in terms of SEO is a huge pain.

    I feel WordPress is infinitely better.

  17. @Zack – I have found terrific success utilizing Blogger and have found nothing but success with my SEO efforts as well. My blog currently ranks #7 for a search term that returns 123 million pages in google – and I don’t utilize the FTP option either. There are simple tricks for title tag manipulation and simply writing optimized content and building links. It really isn’t that much different from SEOing a ‘real’ site.

    On a side note, I have heard about many sites being deleted with no explanation. I would argue though, that the majority of those sites are either spam or involved in illegal practices such as copy written content sharing.

  18. Hi,

    I have a blogger and wordpress blog and while I have not been able to get many comments on them backlinks to my website are good because of these blogs.

  19. I use Blogger for my blog. The service is free, template are fully customizable with a little bit of work.

    In general, my post are indexed on Google in 2 hours after the publish and are in the first positions on Google search result for several keywords.

    In july I received in average 13.000-18.000 visits every day and every times my site is under “Delicious” or “StumbleUpon” effect I receive over 32.000 visits.

    My actual google page rank is 6, in six months. I earn enough money to buy each month an iMac :) Without expenses, with a free service.

    I simply love Blogger.

  20. In this day and age all smallish businesses feel the need to get on social networking just for the sake of it but with so many solutions out there and what do you tweet, blog or post, it is so mind boggling.

    Our company is a new business, we provide roadworthy tests and other vehicle testing services in South Africa; we want to get our brand out there on the web so we decided to setup some social media pages that will hopefully interact with the web and get us new clients in the long run, we hope. After a meeting, we decided to avoid the trap of just setting stuff up and that’s all so we divided responsibility of the social networking aspects between the bosses.

    We’ve setup a twitter page where we talk about our favourite car/ motor related sites and this is fine simple enough so far. Our company also has a facebook group where we offer roadworthy tips and allow anyone to sell their cars on our group, we need to do more work on it but that is going ok. The facebook group has been going on for a few months.

    Recently we decided we should get our CEO to blog, especially since there are lots of things he has come across that he should talk about and it is an avenue for him to talk to our customers. The problem is setting up a wordpress blog on your site and maintaining it takes so much time, simply is it worth it? Especially since most companies run a shoe string budget so you and after reading this article, we have doubts Blogger and Blogspot, it seems like there is no difference between them since they sound like they are owned by Google.

    What do people think we should go for?

  21. We use Blogger. We probably would have self-hosted if it had been slick and easy to set up and get going. The thing with Blogger is the -ease- of set up and use.

    This is why we started with them, and it’s why we’ve stayed with them. That and the benefit of the social networking.

  22. I started on blogger with my first alternative wedding blog, and quickly moved to self-hosted wordpress because I got so annoyed at constantly having to reshuffle the template in bad, roundabout ways to try and make it do what I wanted. I use wordpress for both my websites, and I love it. That TOS is scary – I read it and thought so when I signed up, but I thought you had to be on blogger to get ahead. How much I’ve learned since then!

    I think some people here are a little confused about wordpress.com (wordpress’ free blog platform, similiar to blogspot) and wordpress.org (the open source blog platform you use with your own hosting and domain.)

  23. Unless you’re planning on doing something slimy with your blog content, what does it matter if Google have access and control over your blog? Isn’t it the same, ultimately, with any other hosting sight? If you’re doing something illegal, I’m sure they too would feel obligated to remove it. And wordpress, with all their bogus charges , for every little thing, is a joke.

  24. I can appreciate the information because many people starting on blogs have no clue or bother to read the fine print. With that being said (written), I have been on blogger for almost 6 years with three blogs. I did have a problem with posting pictures and some text without highlight for a little while. I tried to go in on the html but that only proved to be a mess. Since then, I do a preview of the post before publishing.

    As far as Google just deleting accounts, I would have to do more research on that one. There would be no reason the company would do such a thing unless the terms were violated.

    For the most part, while reading this article and the comments, it does seem pro WordPress then anything else. I chose blogger because I was already using google and the blog is free.

    By the way, the article ended abruptly as if some of it had been chopped off. I looked to see if there was a continuation or another page and there isn’t. Is that a new style of writing that I am not familiar with?

  25. Great article btw, An eye opener. I couldnt agree more.
    I absolutely dislike Blogspot. I used to be a heavy blogger up to late 2010, but since the major changes both in the dynamics and the designs, I just switched off to WP self hosted. I honestly have no idea of what these people at Google are up, and you are very right, I had my blogs deactivated a number of times when the content I was displaying was actually mine. It is very frustrating.
    Design-wise? Oh dear, what are dthey doing? It was already outdated even a day after the release, when will they revamp Blogspot? Maybe they way too busy developing the Glass…