Social Media

Paying for diggs

I was just reading [Search Engine Journal](http://www.searchenginejournal.com/?p=3852) and I saw something quite interesting. A site called [User/Submitter](http://www.usersubmitter.com/) is providing a service that will help you get on the digg frontpage. If you are a user you can get paid 50 cents for each story you (http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/beginners-guide-to-digg.html) and as a submitter you are charged a base price of $20 and $1 for each digg you desire.
usersubmitter Paying for diggs
The service is interesting, but digg can ban user names as well as URLs. I don’t think people want to take the risk of having their URL banned from digg. Plus if stories get to the frontpage that users do not like they will just mark them as lame or spam causing the stories to be buried. If you need help with digg, my suggestion is to not pay this company, if you would like some advice about digg just comment on this post and I will do my best to help. You can even checkout my [previous post](http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/how-to-get-on-the-digg-homepage.html) about digg to learn more about it.

 Paying for diggs
Neil Patel is the co-founder of KISSmetrics, an analytics provider that helps companies make better business decisions. Neil also blogs about marketing and entrepreneurship at Quick Sprout.

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5 thoughts on “Paying for diggs

  1. I was thinking about this as well.
    It’s very attractive as someone who writes content to pay for that initial service that will make a post go viral (although it’s been shown time and time again that getting Dugg only nets you around $25 in adsense revenue).
    But all people are doing is poisoning the quality of posts on Digg that may make it a worse service overall.

  2. Because digg is community driven the quality of the stories should stay somewhat high. When a low quality story makes the frontpage digg users mark it as spam which causes the system to remove that story.

  3. $1 per digg is an exorbitant amount, most stories need a couple hundred to reach the front page. Hopefully this doesn’t take off, and taint digg with even more useless marketing crap.

  4. Briggs, I have never seen a story need a 100 diggs to reach the homepage. The highest I have seen is in the 70s, but either way I also don’t want this service to take off.

  5. Technorati knows of this service and it doesn’t work. Don’t waste your time or money.
    Your account and IP was banned under suspicion of violating the digg Terms of Service (http://www.digg.com/tos). We suspect your account, and many others, have been involved in the User/Submitter pay-to-digg/submit ring. After days of research into the issue, we found distinct patterns and behavior that lead to the ban of your account. Pay-to-digg/submit defeats the democratic nature of digg and serves only a small collective of people, not a community.