Social Media

Traffic comparison of StumbleUpon, digg and del.icio.us

During the second week of September I wrote a post called [My 50 favorite design resources](http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/my-50-favorite-design-resources.html) that got traffic as a result of [StumbleUpon](http://www.stumbleupon.com), (http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/beginners-guide-to-digg.html) and [del.icio.us](http://del.icio.us). The article received 11350 visitors from StumbleUpon, 8879 from digg and 2715 from del.icio.us. As a result here are my observations regarding the visitors and overall traffic:
* Digg and del.icio.us can drive thousands of visitors within a 24 hour period, but StumbleUpon can drive lots of traffic over time. The traffic from StumbleUpon really kicked in a couple days after the digg and del.icio.us traffic and stayed strong for about 2 weeks.
* Once the story hit the digg homepage, the server did go down for a while, which is why the digg numbers are a little lower then normal, but one of my general observations is that digg does not drive as much as traffic as it used to just a few months ago. At one point I was getting anywhere from 15,000 to 20,000 visitors from digg if the story hit the homepage at the right time, once Kevin Rose posted about (http://diggtheblog.blogspot.com/2006/09/digg-friends.html) it seems that lot of users have stopped digging as well as submitting stories.
* More of the visitors that came from digg and del.icio.us blogged and linked to the article compared to the visitors that came from StumbleUpon.
* StumbleUpon usually does not drive too much traffic, but it seems that stumblers enjoy design related articles. I was not able to see the traffic stats from other design related articles that have been StumbledUpon, but I did compare the number of people that stumbled design related articles versus other types of articles.
* Although StumbleUpon drove more traffic, from what I could tell the visitors did not “convert” as well as digg or del.icio.us visitors. 43 digg visitors clicked on the RSS feed link, 26 del.icio.us visitors clicked on the RSS feed link and only 13 StumbleUpon visitors to clicked on the RSS feed link.
Being curious about visitors, traffic and web statistics in general, I’d love to hear what type of observations and conclusions others have come to about these or any other social media websites.

7538e7e936f6269f349faadd59e1d9ab 64 Traffic comparison of StumbleUpon, digg and del.icio.us
Neil Patel is the co-founder of KISSmetrics, an analytics provider that helps companies make better business decisions. Neil also blogs about marketing and entrepreneurship at Quick Sprout.

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4 thoughts on “Traffic comparison of StumbleUpon, digg and del.icio.us

  1. Have you guys tried using StumbleUpon?
    It is really for “I’m bored, show me something cool” more than anything else.
    People who use it regularly probably do not read blogs with any kind of frequency. They aren’t looking for something in particular[1] as much as say someone who is reading Digg or del.icio.us would be.
    With digg or del.icio.us they’re at least looking at the summary first to see if they find it interesting… so you’ve already done half the fight.
    [1] I’m referring of course to people who are hitting the “Stumble!” button. People who read the groups or are watching particular users may be more disconcerning.

  2. Engtech you make a good point about StumbleUpon. People are hitting the “stumble” button and are not sure what they are going to see, which is why the conversion rate is lower.

  3. StumbleUpon is great because it’s like television, for the Internet… you get served content, fairly randomly, expect it’s tailored towards your preferences.
    I agree with the backlinks and trackback observations.