Social Media

Do Social Media Marketers Need to Fear Social Saturation?

While we often hear about mainstream sites like Facebook and Twitter, there are literally hundreds of social networks out there. You might figure this to be a good thing for marketers, but according to some new research and expert opinions, it could actually be the opposite. The root of the problem appears to be the growing number of options, or as Josh Wolford of WebProNews calls it, “saturation”.

Research recently conducted by Forrester Research hints that because social media is such a phenomenon across the world, there is little to no room left for new competitors to enter the market. In fact, the firm is predicting that the market will become saturated to the point that some of the smaller, lesser known services eventually fall off the map and cease to exist. Other research shows that users are getting burnt out, so even though social saturation may not be something marketers need to fear, it could be something they need to start addressing.

Understand Your Audience

If your business has a target audience, most of the people that make up that audience are probably interacting with some type of social site on a regular basis. However, it is important to understand that audience and more importantly, discover where those people prefer to hang out online. By conducting a simple survey on your website or via email, you could find out that most of your customers and prospects are active members of Facebook. With this information handy, you can invest your efforts on engaging them with a Facebook page instead of wasting time with Twitter, LinkedIn, or another site they are less likely to engage with.

Mix up Your Marketing

There is no denying what an effective marketing tool social media can be. With that said, it works best when combined with other marketing tactics. This could be traditional methods such as direct mail, or even digital channels like email. It’s that careful balancing act between different platforms that will help both you and your audience avoid the burnout of social saturation. Do this successfully, and both parties will be able to benefit from the best of multiple worlds.

Choose Your Spots Wisely

We have already established the fact that there are a plethora of social networking sites to choose from. There’s really nothing stopping you from creating a presence for your brand wherever you like, but it is wise to focus on just a few, rather than try to conquer the entire social world. Whether it is Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter or another combination, limiting the number of sites you target will enable you to maintain a sharper focus and more importantly, prevent you from burning out too quickly.

Experts often say that social media is here to stay, but still one has wonder if this global phenomenon will ever eventually wear out its welcome. For now, it’s still all the rage, so by monitoring usage trends and reacting accordingly, social marketers can continue to benefit from its popularity.

 Do Social Media Marketers Need to Fear Social Saturation?
Email marketing expert Aidan Hijleh is a freelance copywriter and serves as the Non-Profit Partnership Liaison for Benchmark Email. Aidan advocates free email marketing services to assist with the flourishing of grassroots organizations.

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10 thoughts on “Do Social Media Marketers Need to Fear Social Saturation?

  1. Thanks for an insightful article, one I think accurately addresses the problems faced by today’s marketers or so-called social media gurus :/ I particularly agree with your point about mixing up social media with traditional marketing as this has brought me new social media clients that ironically I wouldn’t have found on social media platforms.

  2. Thanks for the great thoughts I agree. Listening is one of the free tools that we have at our disposal that should be used more.

  3. When anyone (even knowledgeable and respected sourses such Forrester) attempts to make predictions about anything in which “technology” is involved, my first thought is to wounder why would they want to expose them selves to eventual ridicule (people remember the bloopers not who was reight on target). By thier natrure predictions are risky gambits which, at best, is similar to putting a puzzle together, both in the dark and without all the pieces, and then trying to describe your finished work in detail.

    Social media is a phenomeon resulting more from the changes in the forms of human communciation than by insightful business managers looking for a better mouse trap. The principle or phenomenon and technology are not the same thing; the technology is built based on the phenomenon. In practice, before phenomenon can be used for technology they must be harnessed and set up to work, phenomenon can rarely work in their raw form, yet today’s predictions are being made using current technology.

    How far and for long human communications is influenced by social media dominates is just a guses and defies emperical predictions. Some pretty famous and intellectual people have tried to predict the future of technology and make huge mistajkes.

    Let me remind you of just a few boners.
    It was Marconi who said there was no possible way the human voice could be transmitted across the ocean. Thomas Edison said the possibility of a commercial use for the light bulb is so remote as not to be seriously considered.
    When the human Genome began to be studied, researchers thought it would take more than 20 years to study the compete Genome. However, the entire project was completed in less than half that time.
    An 1876 Western Union memo contained this message, “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.”
    Tom Watson, the Chairman and CEO of IBM in 1943 said the world – wide market for computers was maybe five (5).
    Ken Olson the President of the Digital Equipment Corporation said in 1977 there is no reason consumers would want a computer in their homes.
    Bill Gates publically commented in 1992, “No one will ever need more than 620 mg of memory in their PCs.

    Predictions with regard to technology? All we really know is the cost of technology continues to decline at an accelerating pace. In the years ahead, the declining cost of computation will make digital technologies and whether we still call it social media or something else it will be accessible to nearly everyone in all parts of the world, from poorer inner-city neighborhoods in the United States to distant villages in developing nations. These new technologies have the potential to fundamentally transform our communications and how and what people learn throughout their lives. Saturation? I don’t think we are smart enough to know yet.

  4. Final Version:
    When anyone (even knowledgeable and respected sources such Forrester) attempts to make predictions about anything in which “technology” is involved, my first thought is to wonder why would they want to expose themselves to eventual ridicule (people remember the bloopers not who was right on target). By their nature predictions are risky gambits which, at best, is similar to putting a puzzle together, both in the dark and without all the pieces, and then trying to describe your finished work in detail.

    Social media is a phenomenon resulting more from the changes in the forms of human communication than by insightful business managers looking for a better mouse trap. The principle or phenomenon and technology are not the same thing; the technology is built based on the phenomenon. In practice, before phenomenon can be used for technology they must be harnessed and set up to work, phenomenon can rarely work in their raw form, yet today’s predictions are being made using current technology.

    How far and for long human communications is influenced by social media dominates is just a guess and defies empirical predictions. Some pretty famous and intellectual people have tried to predict the future of technology and make huge mistakes.

    Let me remind you of just a few boners.
    It was Marconi who said there was no possible way the human voice could be transmitted across the ocean. Thomas Edison said the possibility of a commercial use for the light bulb is so remote as not to be seriously considered.
    When the human Genome began to be studied, researchers thought it would take more than 20 years to study the compete Genome. However, the entire project was completed in less than half that time.
    An 1876 Western Union memo contained this message, “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.”
    Tom Watson, the Chairman and CEO of IBM in 1943 said the world – wide market for computers was maybe five (5).
    Ken Olson the President of the Digital Equipment Corporation said in 1977 there is no reason consumers would want a computer in their homes.
    Bill Gates publically commented in 1992, “No one will ever need more than 620 mg of memory in their PCs.

    Predictions with regard to technology? All we really know is the cost of technology continues to decline at an accelerating pace. In the years ahead, the declining cost of computation will make digital technologies and whether we still call it social media or something else it will be accessible to nearly everyone in all parts of the world, from poorer inner-city neighborhoods in the United States to distant villages in developing nations. These new technologies have the potential to fundamentally transform our communications and how and what people learn throughout their lives. Saturation? I don’t think we are smart enough to know yet.

  5. Who knows how long this powerful trend will last – the important thing is that we are making the most of out of these social networking sites. If and when this phenomenon will wear out, we will move on to the next

  6. Interesting.. I think last time I’ve heard of the social media stauration topic was this post from Mashable about Sharepocalypse. I think that people will never tire of social media platforms, as it is now embedded in our daily communication. Yet, people will be more choosy and will learn more ways to filter the noise from what really matters to them on the Social Web.

  7. Signing up for every possible social media account isn’t a good idea because there is no way that you can possibly be active in all of them. A social media strategy is only effective if you use the account. An inactive account just looks unprofessional. Choose the ones that your target audience are most likely to use.

  8. I think the social media trend is going to stay for quite sometime as people spend most of their time on social media platforms and are literally addicted to it. That’s why social media marketing is becoming a very big thing now a days!

  9. I think the important step really is understanding and knowing your audience. You have to know if most of your audience are into social media because there are some audience who may have social network accounts but don’t bother to check it from time to time.