Social Media

How To: Use Social Media to Get a Job

I graduated from college about two months ago.  With unemployment rates through the roof, I was scared to be out in the real world.  But thanks to social media, I landed a job in no time.  If you’re utilizing social media to brand yourself (and you should be!), follow these tips to ensure success in your job search.

Tweet, Tweet, Tweet

Twitter is a great resource for job searches, not only because of the great keyword search functionality, but also because you can easily form connections with others in your industry across the world. The first thing you must do is complete your profile.  Make sure you have a photo, link to your blog or another social networking site (perhaps LinkedIn) and a bio.

Then comes the fun part!  Connect with friends and others in your niche.  Do a Twitter search for keywords that pertain to the industry you are looking to work on.  There are many job recruiters on Twitter who post jobs daily, so follow and converse with them.  Also, if you tweet about your job search, you may come up in others’ searches for certain keywords.  The people who find your tweets may be able to help you out!

Take Advantage of LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a professional social network that gives you the opportunity to put your resume online.  Your profile is searchable by recruiters and companies, and then those people are able to message you to inquire more information.  More and more companies are beginning to use LinkedIn to search for future employees.

To get the best results, be sure to request recommendations from previous employers and people you have worked with.  This is a surefire way for prospective employers to know what kind of worker you are.  Also, there are many niche groups you can join on LinkedIn that will post job opportunities available in the field.

Fix up your Facebook

Facebook is undoubtedly the largest social network in the world.  If you have a Facebook profile, make sure you do not have anything on there that you wouldn’t want a future employer to see.  If you have photos that could be considered inappropriate, you should take them off your profile.   But there is more than just censoring your photos to making your Facebook profile foolproof.  An online recruitment site posted their top ten turn-offs found on social networking sites, which include:

  1. References to drug abuse
  2. Extremist / intolerant views, including racism, sexism
  3. Criminal activity
  4. Evidence of excessive alcohol consumption
  5. Inappropriate pictures, including nudity
  6. Foul language
  7. Links to unsuitable websites
  8. Lewd jokes
  9. Silly email addresses
  10. Membership of pointless / silly groups

Begin a Blog

Setting up a blog and discussing topics in your niche will not only help you connect with others interested in the same topics, but it can help you get noticed by industry experts.  Show your readers that you care about what is going on in your industry by carefully researching topics and writing thoughtful posts.  Also, you can add a page on your blog dedicated to your resume with contact information and even a photo.

Once you’re up and posting, research other blogs in the industry you’re looking to work in and actively participate.  Start up a conversation by submitting a comment about a post that interests you. Also, if other blogs you read allow contributors offer to write a post about something you are an expert to further brand your name.

What tips do you have for using social media to find a job?

 How To: Use Social Media to Get a Job
Abby Gilmore is an Internet marketing specialist for Vertical Measures. When she’s not tweeting or blogging, she likes to volunteer with animals.
 How To: Use Social Media to Get a Job
 How To: Use Social Media to Get a Job

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13 thoughts on “How To: Use Social Media to Get a Job

  1. Fantastic! To elaborate a little on LinkedIn, I've heard from a recruiter that she wants to see participation in groups. So don't just join them to “fluff” up your profile. Actively participate and use it as a way to show off.

    1. I absolutely agree! I have made many connections on LinkedIn as a result of participating/answering questions in groups I am associated with. Great tip!

  2. Is there any hard evidence that this method works?

    I will be very interested to see how this developes

  3. Great post, Abby. When I graduated from college last year, I moved to Phoenix and used social media as my primary job search tool. One of the things I did was use search.twitter to find keywords such as “phoenix marketing” and “phoenix jobs” to try and find people and groups – then try and network with them.

    Such a great post – I wish more of my peers who are looking would follow these steps!

    1. Social media was my go to tool for job and internship searching and it has definitely worked out in my favor! Using Twitter and LinkedIn often has also allowed me to connect with so many professionals in the industry, which has also led to great opportunities.

      Glad you liked the post! I hope more people will start to use social media for their job hunts!

  4. silly groups? can you elaborate, that seems a little extreme, for instance i am in a group called i want MIKA's shoes, with some other MIKA fans, just wondering.

    This was a very interesting and informative posting, thank you for taking the time to share your findings with us.

    1. I'm sure the group about the type of shoes you like is fine. However, there are many groups on Facebook that may reveal something about you that you may not want your employer to know, since some information posted on Facebook can get pretty personal.

      Hope this helps, and thanks for reading!

      1. thank you, of course, i think an employer should be careful on what kind of discrimination they are doing, a person being involved in things and socially or politically concious does not make them a potentially bad employee,

        However overall i find your article to be very insightful and helpful, it brings up some interesting questions on what you are willing to compromise in your beliefs for your career though– thank you for giving me so much to think about.

  5. Just one thing I'd add – once you've gotten some recommendations, don't assume they'll be read – you should include them in your resume and cover letters where relevant and appropriate. I noticed a sizable difference in my response rate and the number of interviews/offers I received once I did.

  6. I think you made a great post about commenting and interacting with a company blog. The great thing about doing that is they are often written by individuals, so you can actually get on the radar. I would say that someone should attempt to form some sort of a relationship with the company before flat out asking to get their resume sent to the right place or something like that. But overall, rock solid advice. As somebody who finished bschool 2 years ago, I can say starting my blog is 100% responsible for all the opportunities I've had since and my current job.

    1. Thanks for the feedback! Blogging in general has helped me so much – just by getting my name out there I have connected with many people in my industry. Glad your blog led you to opportunities!