SEO

6 Traits of a Lazy Link Builder

If you’ve ever tried building links to your site, you’ll have some idea how difficult they can be to acquire.  People are always trying to find quick, easier ways to build links.  People are creating services to save you and them time when building links.  But this is not the way to go about acquiring relevant, high-quality inbound links.  You want to be using a professional link building company, rather than a lazy link builder.

Supplied by Barrie Smith of Receptional Ltd, here are some traits of the Lazy Link Builder:

Same Email Request Text

If you haven’t asked your link builder to copy you in on every email link request they send out, you’re very unlikely to know what they’ve sent out in each of their emails.  It’s very easy to write a generic, vague paragraph or two in Microsoft Word that can be relevant to all 100 or so of your targets.  And then send it out, starting with Dear Sir, Dear Webmaster… etc. (I receive these all the time as a gambling affiliate).

This is a common trait of a lazy link builder.  While they’re spending a few minutes doing that, a professional/good/clever/call-us-what-you-like link builder will be getting a feel for each of the 100 websites, trying to find a name of the contact they’re about to email before they personalise the email they send out.  Whether it be a comment about their latest blog post or a compliment about the site; something personal that gets the attention of the recipient.  I’m a firm believer this increases the request conversion rate.

Auto Directory Submission

Unless they’ve improved since I had a look at them, auto directory submissions are a little tool that publish your website to hundreds, sometimes thousands of nonsense directories.  They come with a fee, and take about 5 minutes to submit.  Easy, right?  Lazy?  Ja.  Unless they allow you to use 100 different home page titles (ie the anchor text link you’ll receive from these directories), then you’re also at risk of being penalised for creating a large batch of links with the same anchor text.  Not to mention, just a large bundle of links in quick succession (provided all of the directories you’ve submitted too can process your site within a couple of days).  And what benefits do you really get out of directories?  As far as I can tell, there are only a few worthwhile directories worth submitting too.  Directory submissions are a fine example of quantity not being better than quality.

Manual directory submission is the way around this.  It’s not an exhausting task.  There are a handful of worthy directories, plus there are often a few directories in your niche that are worth submitting too.  Find out if they pass any value before you submit.

Auto Social Bookmarking

Social bookmarking can be a used as a good method to increase exposure and visitors to your website, if done correctly.  But the basic task of submitting a client’s work to a social bookmark doesn’t cut the cheese for me.  The lack of effort and link juice coming back isn’t as effective as it can be.

An effective social bookmarking strategy would be to get a good following on these sites, and help your content go viral to increase its and your popularity.

Linking from their Own Sites

I won’t deny I enjoy winning a client where we have a website or two in the same industry as them, and thereby I have the most straightforward task of linking our site to theirs as an easy win.  But in a lazy link builder’s mind, some of them find it acceptable to build links from all of their unrelated in-house sites sidebars or footers, to the client, presumably to impress the client.  I’m thinking specifically about an example in my mind now as I write this, but trying to build sites to an English site, offering an English service really doesn’t help their rankings when you’re building links to these sites in Bulgarian from a Bulgarian domain!

Taking your time to build up a network of sites and from a range of authors will have much more benefit to you in the future, rather than the quick wins from your own link building company.  Especially when it comes to ending your contract with the chosen link building company, and they just remove all the links from their in-house sites that were pointing to yours.

Blatant Forum Spam

Forum commenting and networking does have its value.  If you’re using these to build up forum reputation, relevant traffic and even potential customers on these sites, it’s all beneficial.  I don’t see any value in the long run for using a forum spamming tool to build links to your site.  Enter a paragraph of text, your anchored link and press submit to spam forums automatically.  Likely to be the same forums that similar lazy link builders have already submitted too, and therefore your website is listed amongst a large number of other links and on unrelated content.  This has no positive benefits and could even turn out to be a negative for you.

Spend 5 minutes a time on each industry-related forum you can find that you think will be beneficial to your company, and post useful, insightful comments to build up your reputation.  The benefits in the long run include reputation, trust and relevant visitors.  Someone who knows your product best, or is most passionate about it would be ideal candidate to do this task.

Blatant Comment Spam

Similar to the forum spam above, blatant comment spam doesn’t have any benefits to your website in the long run.  Again, using tools to do this can often lead to your link being placed on unrelated blogs and amongst a large list of links (bearing in mind that this is a common trait for porn and Viagra sites, do you really want to be listed alongside those?) is not worthwhile.

Commenting on blogs written by powerful people in your industry is another good way to building your reputation, whilst also having the potential to receiving valuable clicks (as demonstrated by Marko Saric).

Don’t fall victim to the lazy link builder!  Make sure they are armed with a creative strategy before you select your link building team!

 6 Traits of a Lazy Link Builder
Nick Andrews is an SEO Consultant for Internet Marketing Company, Receptional Ltd.
 6 Traits of a Lazy Link Builder

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21 thoughts on “6 Traits of a Lazy Link Builder

  1. I think another one is just bringing to the table a lack of diversity and quality. Anyone can pay one of these low cost submission services money to do the work but a true marketer will find those hard to find areas to get a link visible.

  2. Gotta hate that spam. Looking around the site you want to engage before sending the e-mail is definitely a more professional move. It’s just like writing a cover letter. “Mr Smith,” goes a lot further than “Dear Sir.” Not to mention if you have been building your reputation and communicating with the site regularly, they might recognize you from your comments, etc. and be even more willing to go along with your link building campaign, let you do a guest blog post, etc.

  3. My favorite lazy way that blog spammers are using more and more is to copy content from my own blog and then past it as a track back! Now that is BLOODY lazy and a cheeck!

  4. Nick have pointed the issues of spam robots which can appear to be disgusting on the comment thread. The use of such bots for links is just like a suicide for the website that you are promoting and a self suicide it is your own… GOOD JOB NICK, you Got them handcuffed with this article. Thanks!

  5. Even white hat SEO practitioners can fall prey to lazy link building techniques. It can be incredibly frustrating to see people who use these spam tactics doing well in the SERP. Clients get anxious and want results fast, so to keep them happy you whip out a 100 relatively useless and spammy links. It is never worth it in the long run!

  6. I think this is all very useful advice for quality link building; however, your paragraph on social bookmarking was fairly short. Do you have any advice on how to create a good following on social sites? (i.e. best practices)

  7. Another link builder mistake:  commenting on a certain article/write-up and just simple say, “your article is great…” or “this will help…” then segue to marketing their site or blog. It is very important that one will inject additional or valuable info about the article topic. If not, it will fall as spam.  

  8.  I don’t see why Nick had to bring up countries’ names into the article. I’m an SEO specialist that is located in Bulgaria, but do the right stuff for my international customers. Putting up the name “Bulgaria” puts a dark spot on me as Bulgarian.

    And Nick, if you have some bad experience with a certain company or person, please share it with everybody in your articles. Unless you’re willing to that, please don’t go pointing fingers for a whole country ;)

    1. Dear Evgeni,

      Apologies for touching a nerve.  There was no harm intended towards Bulgaria,
      as I clearly pointed out it was an example of a competitor I have previously seen.  The statement points out that Bulgarian language
      anchor text links do not help you rank for English terms in the UK.  If you reread the paragraph again I hope you
      realise there is nothing offensive aimed in the direction of Bulgaria or their
      natives.

      Regards,

      Barrie

       

  9. Dear Nick,
    In Bulgaria we also eat bananas but we are not monkeys !
    So be more professional before you talk about SEO in different countries.

  10. The article is not bad, however if you think that you should give an example of a bad practice by using foreign domains that are using cyrillic in the backlinks, why do you mention Bulgaria and not a particular company? It is quite offending to all of the SEO specialist in Bulgaria. Most probably you have seen an example of a Bad SEO – OK, but there are many capable people providing services for large companies in and outside Bulgaria. Currently there is ~50% internet usage in Bulgaria – in Facebook we’re more than 2 000 000. We are intelligent white people just like you, so please treat us with respect just like we do. Thanks.

  11. IDK what I liked more, your article or reading through these responses.
    Hilarious I tell ya!

    What I think is interesting about link building is that is really does take real TIME EFFORT AND PATIENCE, yet people get so anxious and impatient they’re willing to spend their hard earned money on paying people like “front page google 24 hours” “1,000 links $20″