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13 Reasons Why NoFollow Tags Suck

 13 Reasons Why NoFollow Tags Suck

The NoFollow link attribute (rel=”nofollow”) was originally created to block search engines from following links in blog comments, due to the amount of blog comment spamming.

The theory is that if spammers are spamming in blog comments to get better SEO and anchored links for their sites, NoFollow would render such spam useless. Problem is, spammers still spam.

Now, NoFollow has been adopted beyond blog comments. Wikipedia is now using NoFollow for external links and Google recommends that paid links use a NoFollow attribute.

Here are 13 reasons why NoFollow is a failure.

1. NoFollow = NoWorky. Using NoFollow in blog comments, the original intent of the tag, does nothing to discourage comment spammers. Using other anti-spamming tools such as question, math and plugins such as Akismet and SpamKarma for WordPress is much more effective.

2. If a blogger moderates comments, there is no need for a NoFollow attribute. “Everyone who passes a human inspection should get the link love.”

3. Since the use of NoFollow in comments on WordPress blogs is default, many bloggers do not even realize they are using NoFollow.

4. NoFollow=NoValue. Why use NoFollow on sites, text ads, and blogs if there is no value in terms of search engine indexing? What if they made the Yahoo! directory nofollow? Would anyone continue to purchase listings? Obviously the value of that directory would be zero of nofollow tags were applied to the listings.

5. Linking to someone with a NoFollow attribute is a sign of not trusting them. It’s like reaching to shake someone’s hand, but stopping to put on a pair of latex gloves.

6. No Follow sucks because the search engines (particularly Google) can’t make up their mind about when and how it should be used, thus causing confusion among inexperienced webmasters who do STUPID things like No Follow ALL outgoing links from their website to “protect the site from page rank leakage” and other silly ideas.

7. No-follow is a poor search engine’s solution to conceal its own failure to rank websites appropriately. What’s next, No-linking?

Search engines should be able to develop a method of identifying and devaluing links to spam sites which were placed in blog comments. Why should everyone who posts in blog comments suffer from the actions of a greedy few spammers.

8. Commenting on a blog post is the same as adding more relevant to that blog post. A thought provoking one sentence post can lead to pages of comments. If someone takes the time to help build your site’s content via posting comments, it is professional courtesy to give them some link love.

9. Putting NoFollow on Wikipedia is like putting Grey Poupon on a Spam sandwich.(Or like putting perfume on a pig.)

Taking Wikipedia to task over nofollow is fun but ultimately you need to take them to task for why they implemented nofollow in the first place – that is, to prevent spam. Which in turn means that the way Wikipedia was setup was flawed because it opened itself up to easy spamming.

Therefore, instead of just letting Wikipedia take the easy way out (because ultimately it’s an important resource for many people and replacing it would be tough), they should look at ways into changing their systems so they are not as open to spamming any more.

10. Text link advertisements which use a NoFollow make no sense. If you want to spread your Google juice, why use a link-condom?

11. Even WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg says NoFollow was a failure; “In theory this should work perfectly, but in practice although all major blogging tools did this two years ago and comment and trackback spam is still 100 times worse now. In hindsight, I don’t think nofollow had much of an effect, though I’m still glad we tried it.”

12. Search Engines follow NoFollow. Yahoo has been known to count NoFollow links as backlinks in SiteExplorer. So, if you’re goal in comment spamming to to build backlinks, which builds your site’s value in terms of selling advertising (TLA, ReviewMe, SEOmoz’s PageStrength and other metrics programs use Yahoo Backlinks as valued criteria), NoFollow is useless.

13. NoFollow Sucks. Check It!

What are your thoughts on NoFollow? Do you support the use of NoFollow in Wikipedia or as a way to identify paid links?

Have more reasons why NoFollow is a failure? Please feel free to share them below.

[Thanks to Carsten, Greg, Ahmed, Dave, Everett, Gemme, and John for contributing. You've all been NoFollow'd!]

Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM 13 Reasons Why NoFollow Tags Suck
Loren Baker is the Founder of SEJ, an Advisor at Alpha Brand Media and runs Foundation Digital, a digital marketing strategy & development agency.
Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM 13 Reasons Why NoFollow Tags Suck

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315 thoughts on “13 Reasons Why NoFollow Tags Suck

  1. “You’ve all been NoFollow’d!” Liar.

    Great post Loren. I’m still looking for that WP plug-in that turns a member’s comment link into a followable link after a certain amount of approved posts. Drop me a line if you hear anything.

  2. And what about non automatic spam? A blogger that wants to rise up his page rank, should just say nice words on comments of many blogs with high PR, and would get many strong incoming links just for saying things like:

    “wow, great post!”

    “keep on the good job!”

    “nice one!”

    and so on. Does anyone here blocks this kind of comment? Nofollow does.

    Ok nofollow sux, but is less worse with them.

  3. Yeah Lucas, I hate those types of posts.

    It takes a bit more of your time but when using SpamKarma, labeling such comments as spam wil have those IP’s, sites, and user names added to a blacklist.

    Sure, it takes a bit of time, but it is an alternative.

  4. The only thing I found with using the DoFollow plugin was that people can now search my code for rel=”" and comment away. Luckily akismet and my own eye keep up on that.

  5. I’m not using NoFollow… as of now, Search Engine Journal is using the DoFollow Plugin to turn off the default NoFollow in our blog comments :)

    I wonder if this will lead to more commenting?

  6. I completely agree. I have resorted to following commenter’s links as their username and nofollowing the links inside their comments so they don’t just spam my site with comment links.

    I feel if a user takes the effort to comment, they deserve the link love.

  7. I turned of NoFollow on my blog a few weeks ago. Since I moderate all comments anyway, and use Akismet, it makes no sense to have NoFollow enabled. I didn’t even realize wordpress defaults to using NoFollow and has no way to take it off without using a plugin. If only there was a plugin that allowed selective NoFollow use, for those people who are not yet trusted.

  8. You know what, I was just thinking about removing the nofollow tag from my blog comments as well. I use Akismet and it works pretty well, so yes, people who comment on my blog should get some link love, that’s only fair.

  9. I do like the fact the nofollow prevents spammers from garnering link love. It hasn’t stopped the spamming because they know that there are still lots of blogs that don’t have “nofollow” enabled.

    I’m thinking about turning it off on my site because I think it encourages more people to comment.

  10. I just took the plunge and disabled nofollow on my blog via the DoFollow plug in. Akismet catches the vast majority of spammy comments. It will be interesting to see what happens.

  11. I can’t get what’s the issue about nofollow. 13 reasons are more like two: “doesn’t work for spam”, “is still followed by some engines”.

    About the rest, I don’t think it deserves a post. Ok, it doesn’t work. But it’s still an information added to the link, supported sometimes, unsupported some others. It fails on the spam issue, but it’s still metadata: untrusted link.

    Why I shouldn’t use it if I need it?

  12. Great post. I never got around to adding nofollow to my self-coded blog, largely because I manually moderate comments. But I remember making a mental note some years back that I should add nofollow. Mental note removed.

  13. The Problem with the post is that it is expecting the NoFollow to be the silver bullet for comment spamming.

    I see it as one of the components of fighting spam. Akismet is great. But it still needs minimum moderation from the blog owner.

    Just using NoFollow will not make any difference, but to me its still a step in the right direction.

    And looking from the search engines view, it wants to get links that a page author puts on this page pointing to a third party site. So if the search engine ignores the link that I put on somone elses sites pointing to my own site, what is the problem there??

  14. “Therefore, instead of just letting Wikipedia take the easy way out (because ultimately it’s an important resource for many people and replacing it would be tough), they should look at ways into changing their systems so they are not as open to spamming any more”

    Much easier said that done …

    Wikipedia relies on keeping participation barriers as low as possible to get all that unpaid labor. They like to cost-shift to other people as much as possible. Telling them to do otherwise doesn’t help much because there’s no change in their incentives.

  15. Although I do agree that rel=nofollow is over-rated, I have to say that Wikipedia’s move to incorporate it is, in my opinion, justified.

    Reason being, you have to look at the source of Wikipedia’s content; it’s user submitted. And literally anyone can create or modify entries on Wikipedia. And being a popular resource, Wikipedia is constantly being “leveraged” as a PR-boosting tool.

    On the topic of weblogs on the other hand, I’d have to agree that rel=nofollow is becoming more and more irrelevant by the day. As you’ve rightly mentioned in your post, anti-comment spam plugins have matured enough that virtually all spams get caught almost effortlessly.

  16. Hehe… I have 2 very important WP plugins installed:
    no nofollow – disables rel=nofollow
    wikipedia nofollow – ensures that all wikipedia links on my blog have rel=nofollow

  17. Reason 5 rocks!

    5. Linking to someone with a NoFollow attribute is a sign of not trusting them. It’s like reaching to shake someone’s hand, but stopping to put on a pair of latex gloves.

  18. Some very good points Loren that the Search Engines should think about – nofollow was well intentioned, but yea, seems to have fallen apart. I “digg’ed” you … but appears your story was buried (?)

  19. unfortunately not everyone uses WordPress for their blog, or manages comments like they should. The fact is that tons of people use Blogger.com for their blog and a quick search on any blog search engine you will find tons of people who have no idea what comment spam is and don’t think there is any reason to delete a comment.

    I think this is why comment spam has increased so much over the years, but its also why i switched all my blogs to wordpress :)

  20. So in #1 you say it’s a pathetic effort in preventing spam because it still happens.

    Agreed.

    In #9 you say Wikipedia uses it because it is a way to discourage spam, but they should have found a better system?

    So it sucks.
    If it’s good, the people should have found a better system in the first place…

    nofollow just can’t win with you, huh?

  21. Well, it’s possibly discouraging spam at Wikipedia, but in no way stopping spam, as Wikipedia spam drives a lot of traffic to sites which place their links in it. So yes, Wikipedia should look for a better way to stop spamming.

    And while it may be a bit bold to use DoFollow here at SEJ, which takes the NoFollow attribute out of comments, in the grand scheme of things NoFollow has only been popular for a year or so, and used here at SEJ for about 9 months.

    For 3 years we did not use NoFollow on this blog :)

  22. Great linkbait Loren! I agree with much of what you’re saying. While comment spam was the original problem that nofollow was supposed to solve, I think that the greater concept is still applicable. Yes, it’s a bandaid that’s imposed by the search engines to make their jobs easier. But, I do see the usefulness of it. If you (or any webmaster) do not have good editorial control over what links are placed on your website, nofollow is a good tool to let the search engines know that you cannot vouch for the quality of the links. If you, or Wikipedia, can take the time to give editorial review to all links posted, then of course the nofollow is irrelevant. I think a lot of people have perverted the meaning of it, though. But, that shouldn’t surprise anyone.

  23. Peter, good points.

    I just feel that there can be better ways of combating spam without taking away a little present in the form of organic links to the contributors to this blog and it’s content, which is 80% posting and 20% comments.

  24. I have to say that I’m convinced with all the arguments so far. I personally know a lot of webmasters who are afraid of turning off NoFollow because they were afraid of ‘PR Leak’ .

    Maybe a followup post that addresses this issue would be very useful indeed in pushing the DoFollow agenda.

  25. I absolutely agree; NoFollow sucks!

    That’s why I use the “dofollow” plugin on my blog. I want to spread the linklove.

    But is nofollow not followed? I had a new page in my website crawled, but it only had nofollow links to it. Yahoo’s “linkdomain:” shows also nofollow links and the links in Google webmaster central, at first the backlinks tool showed nofollow links as well (i’ve been told, not confirmed).

    Therefore nofollow is a leaky condom.
    http://www.vdgraaf.info/nofollow-is-a-leaky-condom.html

  26. I can’t remember where I read it but I thought the idea was a good one. Wikipedia should set up a sandbox style system where new submitions are nofollowed for a specific period. Once they have been around for a while and spam can be weeded out, the nofollow fades and it becomes a true linklove link.

    found it:

    Wikipedia would fare much better if they acknowledge the wiki spirit of communities working towards improving articles over time. And there’s a trivial way to ensure “nofollow” becomes sensitive to time. I implemented it in this blog’s comments: any fresh link that is posted receives a “nofollow” attribute, but only for a couple days, upon which the “nofollow” is automatically removed… turning this into a normal link. The reasoning behind this compromise is simple – searchbots will not value spam links here (giving spammers less incentive to post them, too), but any link that is not removed by one of the comment moderators over some short time must be a “trusted” link. The comments still respect the nature of links, and the nature of a community who adds value with outgoing links.

    source:clicky

  27. Nofollow was originally intended to curb blog comments by people looking to artificially increase their rankings. It is debatable whether or not this has worked as intended.

    The problem is most webmasters are completely abusing the nofollow tag and applying it in completely nonstandard ways.

    Some webmasters use nofollow tags on all page links not directly related to their main content, hoping to “decrease PR leak”. So the contact us, about us, faq etc are all nofollowed. The end result is no user will be able to find their contact information through any search. This is a huge step backwards from an open and semantic web.

    I believe there should be a new tag – something that means “i trust this site, its not spam but don’t want it to have full authority as a regular link.”

    1 regular a href
    2 rel=”follow, notspam, partial trust”
    3 rel=”nofollow”

  28. In germany we have a big diskussion about this right now, and a strong movement against nofollow. It turns out that some people really are using it out of stingyness, but most people dont even know.
    I was searching for english language sites that are aware of the problem, and now this issue gets some attention here too.
    What i miss in the diskussion is the fact why there was a field to enter the website in the comment form on blogs in the first place.
    That would be very interesting to know – anyone?

  29. Response to first 4 “reasons”:

    1. Not everyone using WordPress, and using nofollow is easier than writing your own anti-span tools
    2. “If” .. ok, if a blogger has no time to moderates comments, he shouldn’t blog?
    3. The “leave a comment” function is default on WordPress, many bloggers do not even realize they are allowing comment spamming
    4. Another if, “What if they made the Yahoo! directory nofollow?”. What if someone kills himself with a knife? Everyone stop using knife? A tool is useless to idiot doesn’t mean it is useless to average people

  30. Loren – definitely a good move getting rid of NoFollow!

    I use the SEO for FireFox plugin and it highlights in red any link that is nofollowed. It’s surprising how widespread the usage of the nofollow attribute is.

    As a previous commenter mentioned, you’ll definitely get more comments from this. And you’ve also gained one RSS subscriber!

  31. The most sucking issue with nofollow is confusion due to its ongoing semantic morphing. Your great article doesn’t unveil the most popular nofollow-misunderstanding: nofollow doesn’t mean nofollow.

    > 12. Search Engines follow NoFollow.

    They have to follow castrated links. Why shouldn’t they fetch the link destination? rel=nofollow just removes the Googlejuice from a link, it is in no way a crawler directive in the sense of the robots exclusion standard. Meanwhile it sometimes even works as intended by its most common misuse: under particular circumstances it can function as crawl delay directive at least.

    >Yahoo has been known to count NoFollow links as backlinks in SiteExplorer.

    That’s not only Yahoo, Google lists comdomized links in link: searches too, and BTW that’s 100% compliant to the nofollow-microformat and the introducing blog post as well. Again, the problem is that rel=nofollow does not mean nofollow. Just because a link appears in a SERP that doesn’t mean it adds any weight to the link destination’s ranking.

    > So, if you’re goal in comment spamming is to build backlinks, which builds your site’s value in terms of selling advertising (TLA, ReviewMe, SEOmoz’s PageStrength and other metrics programs use Yahoo Backlinks as valued criteria), NoFollow is useless.

    It’s kinda useless for most of its real-world implementations, but not for this reason. It perfectly works as defined. Rel=nofollow removes the Googlejuice, but not the traffic.

    On my blog I’ve a cpl. post explaining the nofollow-fiasco more detailed, I’m looking forward to seeing you there :)

  32. I like the idea, and would stop using nofollow if most comments weren’t the type of “hi nice site bye” comment. I reward good commentators with a link on my blogroll and leaving comments on their site. I don’t see why any random moron should be able to leave me a four word comment just to get a link. Real people with real sites try to spam too.

    Then again I may just be being snotty because the people I would be linking don’t have a clue they’re using nofollow, and linking them wouldn’t result in a link back in 99 percent of all cases.

  33. I sometimes use nofollow when pointing out a site that is bad – I really don’t want that link to boost their search engine rankings. I don’t think it’s the tag that’s bad but perhaps how some people are using it.
    The questions you now have to answer is – have I posted this comment to your blog just to get a back link?, do you care?(assuming it’s a valid comment).
    Current comment spam is fairly easily identified but what if it were created by someone more intelligent, an example generic comment that looks legit and would get through all spam filters would be…
    #I hadn’t thought about it that way before, I’ve been thinking about this for a while and reading a few other blog posts about it – you’ve raised some very interesting points, thanks for the insight.#
    I could write hundreds of these generic comments that most bloggers wouldn’t spot as spam and post them to thousands of blogs – google would love me.

  34. When saying that rel=”nofollow” has not reduced spam, I think you missed the point. The design was to reduce spam in search engine results not to reduce spam in blog comments. For reducing search engine result spam I think it probably has had an effect.

    It was obvious from the outset that this was never going to reduce comment spam. The spammer’s motive is to get people to their site. As a result any link anywhere that when clicked on takes someone to their site is a good advert as far as the spammer is concerned. Ok, they no longer get the increased Google rating but they still get a benefit. To them it is like getting a free AdWords advert.

    In order for rel=”nofollow” to reduce comment spam, it would have to have a negative impact on search engine ranking rather than a neutral one. Making it negative though would never work, as this would obviously penalise far too many legitimate sites.

  35. Great post.
    I think nofollow should be used sparingly, maybe only in blog comments, and there too the admin should have permissions to make selected comments as follow after moderation.

  36. Oh, I forgot.

    Even if we do take the view that the spammer’s motive is solely to increase Google Rank rel=”NoFollow” by itself is still never going to work. The reason for this is that spammers tend to use automated robots. As a result they can leave billions of comments with very little cost. They only need a tiny number of successful spams to achieve their goals. The problem is that in order to reduce the spammer’s return on investment to a point where the activity is no longer viable, absolutely everyone everywhere would have to implement rel=”No Follow” without fail and this is simply never going to happen.

  37. Wikipedia have by putting nofollow on all links “thrown the baby out with the bath water”. Surely a better approach would be to put nofollow on all “new” links, but once checked by an editor the nofollow is removed and the link “locked” from future editoring.

  38. Yes, nofollow is something used by search engines to ensure that search returns relevant pages. In blog context, removing nofollow altogether will cause havoc since most of the blogs are not actively moderated.

  39. Unfortunately I don’t have the time to check the comment links on my blog. I still have quite some manual comment spammers who links to porn etc and then it feels good to have the nofollow. If I would have time to check, then yes, I would disable the nofollow.

    But at least I disabled the nofollow on the pingbacks.

  40. In my experience, nofollow doesn’t do a whole lot for search engines. It seems that they use that as another attribute in their statistics, but not as a hard and fast rule. I think a lot it’s usage is just because it’s turned on by default in a lot of blog engines.

  41. Loren,

    i still dont know if nofollow does suck at all.

    you made a good point, but i am still wondering about the bad intentional actions. Like you said, we will need another ways to control the web index spam.

    So i beg to you make clear to the mass: “that is ok if you don’t want to nofollow externals links, but do care about web index spam.”

  42. You should list some nofollow plugins that people can install, that easily remove the attribute from their site links. I did a quick google search, and there appears to be quite a few…

  43. I blogged about my thoughts on Wikipedia (I agree with yours). But it does beg the question, when the very most valuable links from an immensley trusted source with such a rigorous process of vetting outbound links has no value in a search engine’s algorithm, can even Google trust the nofollow attribute? So I tested it (and reported about it in my blog). It seems that Google is not following nofollow links…at least not yet. Perhaps its days are numbered, but not yet.

    By the way, what do you mean that WordPress bloggers might not even know that nofollow is the default? Hey, wait. I use WordPress. Loren, let me have that plugin!

  44. As of December of 2006, many professionals in both web development and search marketing had been using NOFOLLOW as a means of keeping search engine spiders out of traps and preventing indexing of two URLs for identical content — using it as a means of preventing some of the pitfalls of bad SEO.

    Stopping search engines from infinite loops in web programming URLs and keeping them from indexing the same content for two differnet URLs makes me rather enjoy the NOFOLLOW meta-attribute…

  45. Ha hah…Great post. I especially liked #10.

    10. Text link advertisements which use a NoFollow make no sense. If you want to spread your Google juice, why use a link-condom?

    Great point! Good stuff.

  46. You say “Therefore, instead of just letting Wikipedia take the easy way out (because ultimately it’s an important resource for many people and replacing it would be tough), they should look at ways into changing their systems so they are not as open to spamming any more.”

    I agree with this somewhat. But look what a mess DMOZ is with volunteer editors that have to apply….it is a disaster. I don’t know what the solution is, because the open posting policy on Wikipedia is what made it a success. The failure of most DMOZ editors has made DMOZ what it is – an outdated directory that might have some relevant information in it. DMOZ’s control policies have limited its ability to grow in relevancy to the same level as Wikipedia. So please Wikipedia, don’t implement anything like what DMOZ has done!

  47. I agree that Wikipedia and others need to do something to better control spam but it is also a fact that the majority of people who have blogs have no idea what a nofollow is or how to even prune a “Hey great post” comment.

    Wikipedia is surely going to benefit from all that incoming with no outgoing link power in the future. This will most likely keep them using the thing BTW, lame.

    Google needs to update it’s guidelines with “uses of the nofollow tag”, that would stop all speculation.

    Note: graywolf tried this and now put the nofollow back in place and SEOmoz “believes” and loves the nofollow tag so there you go…

    Thanks for the link, I might also use dofollow on my blog because I can handle spam pretty well, that was your best point Loren. :)

    Also if you think about algorithms and the devaluation of bad link neighborhoods and ranking, you do not want to be part of one if you are looking to remain relevant and keep that “trust” you SEOs talk about.

    So there you go, I am also still unsure and hate this feeling, doesn’t mean I agree that it should be done away with either, just means that Google needs to not rely on us following around Adam Lasnik and Matt Cutts to get answers. I know the rules but the rules bring more questions. ;-(

  48. I think that this is like the BETA tape… It was a great idea, had a lot of potential, but really should have been think about better.

    I mean, the fact there is a “no follow” attribute on a link got the spammers to say:

    “Hey, now I don’t get link love… but heh, what else can I do? I’ll just keep posting here and there, I might drive natural traffic through those powerful blogs anyway”.

    Spammers were like 100% efficient with DoFollow, went to 25% efficient with the nofollow… still there was no alternative… so they kept doing it, hoping many people would forget to do so and many other blogs didn’t have it toggled…

    My 2 cents.

  49. In my site, there are several thousand links to several thousand websites. How can I possibly know if each and everyone is ok, or a spammy site? It’s impossible! Even if at one point each was checked, there’s no telling how will it change in the future… so unless I’m absolutely sure the site I link to is a top recognized/not spammy/authority/whatever, I do choose to use the nofollow tag. For me, it’s a blessing… I don’t have to worry about letting go of my “google juice” to crappy sites… ;)

  50. We’ve been thinking and saying this for months. Many of us Irish have nofollowed our blogs comments because of the reasons out outlines. Comments have increased and we can get a lot more positive feedback.

    It only takes one of the “Big boys” to do it and the rest will, excuse the pun, follow.

  51. I have to say that I did get a few giggles from this post.
    What your saying is 100% accurate but there is a dark side to that thought.
    By removing the no-follow on blogs, it opens up a whole new market of spammers. The “Great Site” or “very informative post, please visit my site” spammers. The object of every blog is to get quality posts and I’m afraid that this will open the flood doors for simple 1 liners.
    What do you think?

  52. Good points Loren.

    I do have a question though: Does the “nofollow” attibute only effect link juice? Would it have any effects on affiliate or referral links?

  53. Loren is missing one part of the equation that is vital – a comments policy that clearly defines what is allowed.

    What I will also be introducing soon on my blog is a cookie based system that switches off commenting until someone has read the comments policy.

    I think the percentage of high quality comments will actually increase, especially if you have smart SEOs reading your content, because the relevance of a link is based upon the text around it, not just the anchor text.

    I have even just used my optional link to link through to my own comments policy. In that way it actually offers more value to Loren’s page as well.

  54. Doug Karr’s point below…

    wikipedia nofollow – ensures that all wikipedia links on my blog have rel=nofollow

    Yes indeed Doug, splendid idea – let’s see how wikipedia like it up ‘em- they’ll be doing more than moaning about lack of donations, that’s for sure!

    A friend of mine has an authority site operating in a ‘government’ niche area. It’s a news and information portal.

    He wrote a huge information article type page on wikipedia covering the particular area that he has renowned ‘expert’ knowledge in, this page inturn is now linked by uni and government sites.

    His reward for his hard work and effort was until recently a link at the bottom of the page back to his own site.

    Not any more! He’s utterly disgusted with wikipedia’s ‘no-follow’ on links decision.

    Number 8 covers this – if you’re using comments to ultimately help build your site, be they in blogs, forums, wikis type sites or whatever; there’s no incentive or reward for those who actually make the effort to add informative comments if you use the ‘no-follow’ tag.

    Yeah sure you still may get click thru traffic from the link, (which is something people sometimes forget when they’re totally focused on PR chasing.) but you do end up feeling a little cheated.

  55. It’s not so much the devaluing of comment links I don’t like (which seems to be one of the main arguments here) but the fact that a new tag was introduced overnight that has far more implications than it’s original intended purpose.

    I think it’s very weird that Google condone or even encourage use of the nofollow tag beyond what it was originally designed for (am i being naive here?).

  56. When I first heard about nofollow, I thought to myself, “this might be an opportunity”. If I can create some sites that don’t use it, then that would be an added incentive for folks to come post there, assuming everyone else starts using the nofollow tag.

  57. I had never thought of the NoFollow in these terms. I may have to adjust my attitude towards them. I may even turn it off on my blog. When one domino falls…

  58. No Follow, The main reason why people spam is it pays to. If anything affects how much a spammer is paid, they make more spam to compensate. The only way to prevent spam is to make it not pay. No Follow only promotes the idea that a webserver cpu somewhere needs to run the spam program for a little longer to build more pages. Nothing will cure a fundemental flaw in online advertising. Web 3.0 anyone?

  59. I’m pretty sure Google still follows every link they find, they just don’t count the nofollow ones in their page rank algorithm.

    What you need to keep them out of certain areas of your site is a robots.txt file.

  60. I completely agree with you on the nofollow issue.

    We don’t use nofollow links on our website either. Especially on point 7. Googles justification for the page rank algorithm was that it was an unbiased metric of the popularity of a website. Nofollow is their way of admitting they were wrong.

  61. We don’t use them, I think linking to other sites is about the users not the engines. If I get a crappy link posted on one of our sites it comes down – quickly. It’s interesting to see the new Google link tool reporting nofollow links – what is that all about? Is the condom falling off ?

  62. It’s amazing the number of people who feel empowered to tell the volunteers at Wikipedia that they are doing it wrong, all wrong.

    Do you normally act that way with gifts, Loren? If so, I’d like to see some video of next time you tell your sweetie, “Boy, this sweater you knitted for me is ugly and uncomfortable. You should figure out how to do it better. Or something.”

    There are articles out there from your fellow SEO vendors explaining how to sneak links into Wikipedia articles to build up page rank. Rather than pointless whining, have you considered stopping SEOers from doing that? Or using your magic SEO powers to clean up Wikipedia instead of demanding everybody else do it for you?

    It is, after all, the encyclopedia anyone can edit, so nothing’s stopping you.

  63. Even if Nofollow did prevent comment spam (which it doesn’t really), it’s missing the point. Any time you allow comments, you’re allowing someone to write on your site. Why wouldn’t you take the time to prevent someone from defacing it? If you don’t have time to manually approve your comments, at least use a anti-spam plugin or some other automatted method to prevent it.

    It looks bad on YOU if your site has spam on it. If someone autoapproves more than a couple spam comments on a site, I run from it. These type of webmasters want pageviews, not visitors.

  64. Interesting reasons. Some are just comments but brings home the point.

    When commentors taken the time to post a note on your blog and pass the Akismet test, they deserve to get a little link juice. Remember the web is about cross-linking.

    User generated content is the best thing that can happen to your blog – reward them and they will be happy to add some more. Win-win.

  65. Replying to Lucas Castro’s comment re crap “well done” posts. I am sure everyone hates them but everyone wants to get a pat on the back for a job well done.

    Why not simply expand on the “Approve / Publish Comments” function in the Blog control panel to allow or disallow NOFOLLOW on a per post basis.

    That way it is a decision of the blogger as to whether they feel the comment is worthy of a backlink.

    Sure it will add a couple of seconds to the moderation of the post but you will be able to easilly maintain a balance between blocking spam links and link love!

  66. I was against nofollow when it came out originally (and wrote about it several times at the time) and didn’t require two years to make up my mind to disable it in the comments section, but it’s nice to see SEJ finally coming around on this one and doing the right thing.

  67. Loren, this is not linkbaiting but comment baiting. Your 80% post 20% comments break down is certainly not reflected by this post :).

    Aaron: SEOmoz removes the nofollow once you contributed for a while and have proven that you not just add worthless comments, although I think the 100 “points” is set a bit too high.

    I disapprove the nofollow at Michael’s Blog. This, including the loss of a lot of comments (including some long ones I did) makes me really think twice about commenting at his blog in the future.

  68. Here’s a +1 in favor of nofollow on Wikipedia. I wasn’t sure at first, but I’ve noticed that many of the people who are against this are the same people who are link spamming Wikipedia. Sounds like it worked!

  69. The only reason of using no follow is not to make the google thing that they have so any outgoing links.They dont like if you have pages with full of ougoing links.

    Moreover if you have too many outbound links it will reduce ur pr

  70. Loren and others.
    I decided to write a quick plugin to turn off nofollow for commenters who have commented a certain number of times.
    The default is set to 10 comments but can be changed.
    This stops quick comments for link love and allows a blogger to share the link love with those who are actively part of the community.
    Link Love Plugin

  71. Google must decide if a link is good or bad, not the webmaster.

    A lot of patents, technology and a Google doesn´t know to do with a link in a blog…

    Can I translate this to Spanish?? This post is great.

  72. I recently updated my site and changed my extension names. I have multiple pages out there that have duplicate content now and am wondering what is the best way to not get penalized by the search engines for duplicate content? Can I use a NoFollow on the older pages to prevent duplicate content of sites or should a 301 redirect be used?

  73. I agree the tag is stupid although because what they don’t realise is that people don’t spam comments for higher PR rating thats stupid, especially when its usually cheap drugs spam or borderline auto spam they do it for the direct promotion i.e they hit enough of these blog comments people around guarnteed to click them. It just so happens that they used to (without ref=”nofollow”) get a pr boost.

  74. Nice article.

    I think there is a place for a ‘this link is crap’ or ‘I choose not to convey love to this link’ type tool, but in general it shouldn’t be used to gag blog commenters. Any blog worth its salt should be moderating its commenters, those that dont well..nuff said really.

  75. I moderate all comments on my blogs (4). I am not interested in comments that link to pharmaceutical wonders or splogs put up to milk Google Adwords.

    I am against turning comments off completely. If a blog does not allow comments, I do not visit again.

  76. Thank you for taking this stance and putting this out there. Also thanks for pointing me towards the dofollow plug in for wordpress.

  77. I manage a number of websites and there have been numerous occasions where I have spotted backlinks from links with the nofollow tag – conclusion: it does not work.

  78. Using nofollow on WikiPedia is crazy. Taking the value out of links from MediaWiki is removing the value of tens of thousands of publicly-moderated, human evaluated links is unfortunate. In that respect, WikiPEdia was the ultimate dmoz.
    Using nofollow as a crutch is sad. Let the editors (everyone) do their job. It was working.

  79. yeah now everyone is using no follow even when linking! so now when you link to goggle, yahoo or any popular site remember to tag no follow too!

  80. Great post Loren. I find the “pink links” everywhere I’m reading now.

    I’m going to go turn off nofollow on my blogs’ comments sections and see how that goes.

    Like you said, Askimet does such a great job of stopping spam already. I find that combining Askimet with the WordPress option “moderate posts with X links” and setting X to 1 is very effective.

  81. Interesting list, but I think it over-simplifies the impact and importance of NoFollow. If hyperlinks are to be treated as votes (as PageRank-style algorithms do), why would we not want to give the “electorate” a strong ability to express the intent of each vote? We need more controls along the lines of NoFollow, not less. I talk about this more fully here.

  82. Good conversation…

    What I’d really like to know is why did Google implement the “nofollow” rule in the first place?

    Surely they knew it would be a misserable failure so there must have been other reasons.

    I just think that links in blogs were stuffing up there rankings and they wanted to remove them altogether.

    Is “nofollow” tags another way of tracking people with SEO knowledge, I wonder!

    The fact is, Google did this for other reasons that they haven’t been honest about and it certainly wasn’t to help all the blogf editors out there and their fight against spam.

    Any insight anyone?

    Regards, Chris

  83. Loren,

    I argued this exact point at a technology conference in London just 3 weeks ago. Nofollow could well signal the beginning of the end for Google. As you say, if you’re going to nofollow links why not ban them altogether. No links = no Google.

  84. Excellent discussion, lots of different viewpoints. Personally I don’t like the no follow. The cartoons posted by Jim cook are great.

  85. Loren,
    I think you have carved out your place in internet history my friend. Your picture and bio will be in Wikapedia in no time under the title “NoWorky”

    LOVE IT man!!!

    paul

  86. On the topic of weblogs on the other hand, I’d have to agree that rel=nofollow is becoming more and more irrelevant by the day. As you’ve rightly mentioned in your post, anti-comment spam plugins have matured enough that virtually all spams get caught almost effortlessly.

  87. I run a search engine ( Winzy ). Should I be using no follow on my search results? I get a feed from my search provider and I haven’t endorsed any of the paid or algorithmic links myself

  88. Good article, i agree with a lot of points.
    When about Wikipedia, i think, that putting a blocking for linking is a good idea, since there is no chance of finding and controlling all the content and links created by the millions of editors.
    As for the blogs, I agree, using Moderation and Askimet is basically solving the problem with a spam and useless linking.

  89. What Wikipedia did was inevitable. You just can’t blame them for trying everything in their power to make their project as clean as possible. But using nofollow on blogs and ordinary pages is just silly.

    Nice post, good discussion.

  90. The no follow tag was and is a failure since it was adopted. With search engines still following them, and the spammers still spamming blog comments. It’s why I am thankful for Askimet.

  91. Excellent article and an excellent argument has been made here for removing no follow but I still feel that some sort of a grading system like a number of posts before the tag is removed scenario is probably the best route to travel.

  92. I think the choice is simple! nofollow doesn’t help it hurts! I won’t comment on a nofollow blog even if it’s talking about something I like!
    it’s like kicking your commenter in the teeth and then sayin well nothing! the hell with you! it’s an insult to commenters! thanks for telling it like a champ! good job!

  93. I think that you need some sort of way for others to know that the link is NOT NoFollow. With it being the default in so many places people are used to that being the way things work. I really like someone’s suggestion above about a plugin that removes NoFollow after someone has had a certain number of comments, but the fact remains that you need a way to inform your readers of that… Perhaps just an extra line of text above the “Leave a Comment” block stating that their website link will NOT be NoFollow or will not be NoFollow after so many posts.

  94. I also run the DoFollow plugin from Semiologic on my blog, but agree with the above statement that WordPress should have an easy to use radio button in the options of the admin panel with DoFollow/NoFollow

  95. NoFollow is just a lazy excuse to prevent spam, which in the end makes the web a nonhuman-friendly place, since it “NoWorky.”

    I haven’t change wordpress settings, but I will pluginize myself now that you reminded me (It was on my agenda for things-to-do-but-memory-is-failing).

  96. What a joke nofollow is, yet it’s still around.

    The one that really got to me was Wikipedia, as they rank for everything, and won’t share the love.

    Luckily I can nofollow my links to their articles.

  97. The interaction between bloggers and commenter should be like the social interaction in the real world. My brother-in-law is an intellectual property rights lawyer. He gives free speeches and seminars to entrepreneurs who have a vested interest in the subject. Both he and they know he does it to try to get new clients. When at the end of his discussion he hands out cards no one storms off disgusted at the thought that he was marketing to them. On the web on the other hand if you leave even a simple link like area rugs in a post that is applicable or even helpful, the post or link is often mediated out. People watch free TV shows and put up with commercials and product placement because they get something out of it. I am very surprised by how people’s reactions in the real world differ from their reactions online. The web is still in its infancy and has a lot of maturing to do so we still see a lot of over reaction to marketing online but I am sure as it ages we will see the market place relax.

  98. I’m a believer in the value of careful management of outgoing links – so in blog posts I link to relevant, good quality sites.

    If you ‘dofollow’ comments, won’t each post end up with potentially endless non-relevant links which could negatively affect the search engine ranking of that page, and on an ongoing basis your site?

    Am I missing something?

  99. As someone who is concerned about search engine results, but not someone who actively follows the SEO community, I find all of this very interesting. The only reason to dislike the no-follow tag is if you yourself use blogs as a way to gain pagerank. I think the nofollow tag just gives the webmasters an additional way to control the value of outgoing links. Who cares if wikipedia uses the nofollow tag? The only ones who care are the ones who have links from wikipedia. And if you have a link from wikipedia that is deserved, you probably have tons of other good links out there. On top of it, I’m assuming this site doesn’t use the nofollow tag, and it’s amazing how people will try to sneak in links throughout their comments even here, where people are trying to make an argument about why the nofollow tag is bad. Just my opinion of course!

  100. As a reletively new webmaster I was not aware of the differance in follow or no follow, Does it affect my linkbacks, traffic or pagerank at google. I own a few web directories and just turned the no-follow attribute off because all the honest directory postings were not getting their just reward. And I also reallise the wast of all those good posts and info that should get indexed.
    Dan Bradstreet

  101. matt D on Mar 21, 2007 at 2:18 pm asked

    So, does anyone have a list of sites, directories, blogs that do not use no follow?

    Yeah sure matt, here’s a couple of places you can get a list of large numbers of ‘SEO friendly’ directories.

    Directory Critic has over 4000 listed.
    Strongest Directories
    lists SEO friendly directories by page strength, it uses all kinds of interesting stats to determine the strength of each directory.

    Enjoy!

  102. Wow, I never realized all this. I hear all over that Google downgrades your site if you don’t use nofollow in external links? If not, then I’d like to start using rel=”external” rather than rel=”nofollow”. Give some love to the decent commentators. How do I enable this in wordpress?

  103. I do believe that if you wish to use a tag like rel=”external” on a WordPress Blog you can tweak the Do Follow plugin code to replace rel=”no follow” with rel=”external”.

    But why would you want to label them as external? If they point to another site, bots already no that they are external or outbound links.

    Search engines will not penalize you for organic linking to external sites, as such is the building block of the Internet and search algorithms.

  104. I have posted to several tax and legal forums over the years. It takes a lot of time to post well written, thoughtful comments but I enjoy doing explaining legal and tax issues to people who need some general direction.

    One of the side effects of the “nofollow” for me is that I have chosen to post primarily to those sites that don’t use “nofollow.” If every forum used it, I would still probably continue to post, but if 5 use it and one doesn’t, I’ll spend the time on the site that gives me some benefit in return for my effort.

  105. I stumbled across this page when Googling “firefox nofollow plugin” and agree with pretty much all your points Loren. Sites that ‘do follow’ definitely provide more motivation for commenting, and on my own blogs I make sure to practice what I preach. It’s frustrating that so many users of blogger, wordpress, etc don’t even realize they’re not reciprocating the ‘link juice’, but hopefully a few of them will read your article and recognize the merits of doing so. Thanks!

  106. Google is becoming nothing more than an index to WikiPedia. The addition of nofollow tags has accelerated this because WikiP no longer “leaks” (ie doesn’t give credit where credit is due) Page Rank out of its site.

    I have instituted a “no links to wikipedia AT ALL” rule in my forums and in any personal blogging or posting that I do.

  107. I haven’t eaten today so I can’t think of anything funny to post about no follow tags. So I’ll just use the standard cop-out post:

    “Great post [web site owner I don't know, whom I just found through google under the term "no ref no follow"].

    I couldn’t agree more with points [random #, but in this #2 & 5 because I did read this post].

    Anywho, you have a new subscriber (73% of the time a bold-faced lie) and I really love your site (just don’t ask me who you are or what your site is about).

    Oh, one last thing before I go. I love this post about no follow, no ref, no tags, search engines, google, search engine journals, and anything else you got.

    Do check out my blog about [topic I'm not all too familiar with] and be sure to click on my ads!”

    This post scores a measly 2.4 on a funny scale of 1 to 10. Sorry. After my steak I’ll be funny again.

  108. Funny Stuff, what can I tell ya.

    People are people .. can’t live with them, can’t shoot them. What’s left? Either cope with it or ignore it, whatever suits you best.

    I am a cynic, and after my steak, I will just switch to sarcasm instead :)

  109. Thank you for this list. This was very helpful to me.
    I personally can recommend the last three links. In my opinion they are outstanding.
    I don’t like the approaches with images and/or javascript. Using only CSS and HTML is the a very good way.

  110. I personally use nofollow for outbound free links on my site, like within my directory. There is no reason for me to pass on value for thousands of free links when my site gets heavy traffic already. My intented purpose is to notify the search engines, that these links were not posted by my site. Now paid links is different, because if you pay then you are looking to get link value.

    I personally like the nofollow attribute as I feel it builds a better trust relationship with the search engines. That’s just me though!

  111. Thank you Loren for not letting in ugly nofollow in here.
    [..builds a better trust relationship with the search engines..] now that is some statement!
    Ant Onaf why don’t you just ask google to marry you ? Me personally- I don’t trust SE period.

  112. I completely agree with you on the nofollow issue.
    We don’t use nofollow links on our website either. Especially on point 7. Googles justification for the page rank algorithm was that it was an unbiased metric of the popularity of a website. Nofollow is their way of admitting they were wrong.

  113. The other reason nofollow doesn’t work: as long as there’s a miniscule chance someone will click the link on the original blog post, it’s still worth it to spam blogs.

  114. Just a note about the Dofollow community on Bumpzee

    As a rule I don’t add any sites to it manually, but it would be good to see SEJ there in the future.

  115. Indeed is quite a movement now, slowly a lot of bloggers are going without the nofollow attribute BUT still is quite ok to use it when for example you want to link to your “no buddies”.

  116. I think these blog is really useful for new comers and Excellent resource list.
    It´s a very interesting Blog and simple answer of many questions.
    Keep up the good work!
    Thanks it helps me a lot…

  117. I have been testing the nofollow attribute on sites and I definitely agree with the use of nofollow tags for increasing textlinkad commissions as well as other forms of advertising. I understand that nofollow doesn’t matter with Google, but it seems that as your link saturation builds up, the Google bots come to your site and increase your popularity regardless of the links that have the nofollow tag.

    Keep up the posts and I will be writing large posts on the “nofollow” tag in the near future on my site (can be accessed at the site indexed by my name).

  118. What is with all these spammy Polish comments suddenly.

    Seriously guys, add some value to your commenting or you will constantly give yourself a bad reputation, and probably have a negative effect of the collective intelligence of spam filters for legitimate commenters residing in Poland.

  119. The only way to prevent spam is to make it not pay.
    But I remember making a mental note some years back that I should add nofollow. Mental note removed.

  120. I must agree. There are simple ways to protect from automated spam robots. I have changed input form field names from for example “description”, “url”, “title” , … to some “yadayada” :)

  121. Thanks, i was desperately looking for that info!, great and excellent article, it’s realy helpful. Covering some points I really needed, really useful and Excellent resource list.

  122. Thanks for a great post. I just started my new blog and have implemented a do follow policy as well.

    The comments have also been very enlightening and I totally agree that the reader comments actually do, in a very large part, contribute to the essence of a blog. I, for one, tend to look over the comments and often times find that the readers have a lot to offer in respect to the post.

    WhatSimplyWorks.com

  123. >>Yes, Andy Beard has!
    >>BUMPzee is a niche blog aggregator with a community on top.
    >>Andy has created a nofollow community there.
    >>He invites you to join him.
    >>http://www.bumpzee.com/no-nofollow/
    >>Regards, Case Stevens

    This is not a good idea to publish NofollowBlog’s list. Spammers will actively write in these blogs.

    >>David Staub on May 18, 2007 at 9:34 pm
    >>I have posted to several tax and legal forums over the years. [some skipped]
    >>If every forum used it, I would still probably continue to post, but if 5 use it and one doesn’t,
    >>I’ll spend the time on the site that gives me
    >>some benefit in return for my effort.

    Forums are more strongly protected against a spam than blogs. At forums is available more posts control facilities, example it is possible to add “nofollow” for not registered users or at whom less than 10 posts.

  124. All our links are followed, we do not use no-follow tags, also all reciprocal links will be featured and at the top of every sub – category page. These featured sites get tons of free exposure.

  125. I have to say this is a pretty impressive site. I really enjoy how you use good titles, numbers in your posts for example, and it seems like you have a solid niche here that you have established. My friend and mentor Courtney Tuttle has been doing really well. I don’t know if you have taken a look at his site at all, but he has done very well and your skill reminds me of his. I would love to read more and look forward to other articles.

  126. Nofollow is something used by search engines to ensure that search returns relevant pages. In blog context, removing nofollow altogether will cause havoc since most of the blogs are not actively moderated.

  127. This is definitely an eye opener. For a moment I was kind of lost on whether I will be credited with backlinks on blogs that have nofollow tag. Seems that it’s useless. Thanks for the thumbs up!

  128. Based on the number spammy-type comments here, I think you should turn on your own nofollow tags.

    I agree, though, that they are a tactic used to mask the failures of sucky page rank engines.

  129. I totally agree that no follow links are almost useless, I own 3 directories that get hundreds of sign up requests for free targeted web Traffic since I removed my no follow tags.

  130. Thanks for very interesting article. btw. I really enjoyed reading all of your posts. It’s interesting to read ideas, and observations from someone else’s point of view… makes you think more. So please keep up the great work. Greetings

  131. Thanks for a very interesting article; I agree with you 100%.

    Since Google recommends that paid links use a NoFollow attribute then why doesn’t Google practice what it preaches? Google advertises on millions of websites with their “Ad by Google” and they don’t have a NoFollow attribute.

  132. The nofollow tag is good at times for me but your points are actually VERY valid. I do a lot of SEO work on my website and always try to avoid sites with nofollow for trading links. It’s funny google doesn’t do nofollow on any of their own links or ads that are around… What is the answer though? More fill in the blank funny images?

  133. Nofollow is intended for using in places where you have no control over user generated content. Just like the comments here. Just take a quick glance at the comments above to find plenty of reasons why nofollow may sometimes be a good choice.

  134. Nofollow is good if you don’t have time to manage those spam links, it just isn’t for everyone..

    ——
    Meow

  135. Great Post!

    After reading this I have installed DoFollow and Wikipedia nofollow plugins on my blog.

    What would be interesting to me is what other solutions are currently being discussed for this this short of spam filters like Akismet, captchas, and enabling nofollow which clearly doesn’t appear to function as hoped?

  136. Absolutely agree with the Author. I don’t understand why such big gurus like Darren Rowse and John Chow use this terrible tag?

  137. Want to tell everyone that you’ve turned off the nofollow in your comments? Check out my new “ifollow” logos- grab one for your sidebar!

  138. I agree with alot of your points, I have to say it’s just a cat and mouse game. The turning on of dofollow only temporarily increases the traffic on your blog, untill eventually everyone will have done it and it makes no difference.
    Therefore it’s an interesting marketing stunt to publicly display that your activating a dofollow, so that people start posting more to get linkjuice,
    smart idea!

  139. Text link condom? Huh?
    So, let’s get this straight: a text link on my site constitutes my site’s advocacy for the advertiser’s site, and hence a donation of link juice?
    I don’t think so. Just as when Nike advertise on TV, the TV channel is not endorsing Nike, nor would you expect that pressing “BBC1″ on your remote would suddenly start the “Nike channel” (OK, OK, BBC1 doesn’t have adverts, but at least everone knows the BBC….).
    All of the advertisers on our site are only interested in advertising on the home page, despite me repeatedly telling them that our homepage is only viewed by 15% of visitors, and that the band and gig pages are viewed by 60% of visitors. So, they either don’t believe me, or they are just trying to steal some juice.
    I suspect the latter, hence my “nofollow” on ads.
    We’ve just had an advertiser refuse to renew due to the nofollow… now why would that be, then….
    The condom analogy is nice, but I prefer this one:
    When the guy your shaking hands with reaches into your pocket, counter with your left upper-cut.

  140. Great Article, The only place I use nofollow for is on my blog, I don’t want my site linking to a bunch of other peoples and penalizing me by lowering my SEO rankings.

  141. Spot on, Loren, completely hasn’t been thought through from an implementation or long term perspective.

    As you say, surely far more effective and ultimately fair options exist.

  142. yeah…
    wonder what happen if we all use nofollow on our websites? And how about DMOZ & Yahoo directory.

    Have a good one.

  143. This post is basically a trackback, but Postnuke’s trackback module is a somewhat raw, so I’ll do it manually :)

    Basically, there would be no point in the No Follow tag, if we all were to use Anti-Spam plug-ins and software as standard. This tag is severely weakened by Yahoo not implementing it into their SERPS.

    Trackback is almost as invaluable as Alexa, but both are commonly used…

  144. Hi, Thanks for very interesting article. I really enjoyed reading all of your articles. It’s interesting to read ideas, and observations from someone else’s point of view… makes you think more. Keep up the good work. Greetings,

  145. I can’t agree more. Nofollow sucks indeed, though it might be very usefull for some sites like Wikipedia.

    I’m sure you do get more (spam) comments without nofollow links, which is great to see!

  146. Shaun, AdSense Ad links are generated by Javascript and crawlers don’t execute JavaScript = no Ads on the page for the spider = no need to add nofollow….!!!

  147. prompt what write scpipt check Nofollow I have a program BlogCommentDemon but she collects all contract blogs
    if who will give me script I divide program.

  148. Surely if the moderation is good enough, you can filter out the spam from the decent comments. Good moderation in blogs is essential for a blog that is interesting and will be visited because of this, not because people put in rubbish posts.

  149. I agree if you take the time to post a decent response and are not a spambot then you should get link love! Yeah… I think its a little overboard, but with Wikipedia doing it… thats insanse. They don’t need to streamline the PR 8 site. Are they hoping for a 9 if they dont link to anyone?

  150. Great article Loren! NoFollow coud be used only on paid links but then again nobody would buy them or they would demand a lower price. I used to have NoFollow on one of my blogs but since removing it and adding moderation i’ve got more useful and interesting comments!

  151. I would say, “No to No nofollow”! Let’s now start removing all wikipedia.org links on our websites and let’s see what will happen. It really sucks. It’s just unfair.

  152. Almost all the Popular websites who started early like yahoo, wiki have gained the popularity by linking from small sites. Now they are shying out to share the a small piece of the cake.For a new person who wants to start his career with web, no juice left for him.

  153. In some of my blogs before I understood what this no follow thingy was I would start approving comments as that one of the things I like about blogging. It seemed that the spammers caught on that I was using do follow and started to blow my blog comment fields up to the point where it was at over 100 a day. I did eventually add no follow but that didnt stop them. I gave up with comments, but I did feel bad because some genuine responses could be in the list.

  154. We have designed sites without the no-follow tag, and in the end, a moderated comment system rewards good posters and helps promote more interaction with your site by visitors.

    Just my two cents.

  155. I got the wordpress plugin dofollow and am going to install that to get around nofollow. I agree, it doesn’t discourage comment spam, but it does discourage real comments. Lets face it, people do comment when they know they’ll get a little link love.

  156. On the topic of weblogs on the other hand, I’d have to agree that rel=nofollow is becoming more and more irrelevant by the day. As you’ve rightly mentioned in your post, anti-comment spam plugins have matured enough that virtually all spams get caught almost effortlessly.
    Thanks

  157. Hey Hi everyone here being present!!!
    Excuse me I bad know the English.
    Say please. Where find program of the check false pr
    FAKE PAGERANK Tools free

  158. First, using rel=”nofollow” in a paid link will keep you from getting in trouble with Google since it can’t be seen as trying to sell PageRank. Second, it seems like using rel=”nofollow” on a page full of useful links would let Google know that you aren’t trying to be a link farm. I also link to many web sites as clarification and for definitions, but to keep Google from thinking I’m being paid to link to those sites, I’m going to add rel=”nofollow” to the links. Google might flip the other direction and start punishing me for using rel=”nofollow” so many times, but Google is already punishing me for not using it, so I’m adding rel=”nofollow” to almost all of my external links and I’ll see what happens.

  159. The only way to better block comment spam is to make people jump through a bunch of hoops before they can click submit. Maybe a few math questions, CAPTCHA and a few shape id’s. Only problem is it would deter the normal folks from posting. I guess the answer is unclear still…

  160. Random Terrain’s points are exactly what I’m wondering about… Does Google penalize the site for not doing “no follow”? Might they “reward” the site, as a result of perceived trust, if one does use “no follow”?

    It’s understandable to want to give “link love” in exchange for comments that contribute to a site’s content. But what about in a directory of gathered links that the site is just wanting to provide its visitors “for more information”? Should those links be “no follow”?

  161. We have designed sites without the no-follow tag, and in the end, a moderated comment system rewards good posters and helps promote more interaction with your site by visitors. Thanks.