Social Media

Spying on Digg

One of the most commonly used feature on [Digg](http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/beginners-guide-to-digg.html) is [Digg Spy](http://digg.com/spy), most people are using it as a way to see what stories people are submitting, digging, burying and commenting on. Digg Spy is great for all of those things, but it can do a lot more for you.
diggspy Spying on Digg
Building relationships
One of your goals maybe to get stories promoted to the Digg homepage. Digg has a [friends](http://digg.com/users/digitalgopher/friends/list) feature where you can befriend people in hopes that they will friend you back and also digg all of your submissions. If you are looking for active members who are compulsive diggers and digg tons of stories within minutes, Digg Spy is a great way to find them. Every once in a while you may see a user just digg 10 stories within a few minutes which means he/she usually diggs based on the title and description and does not read the story. If your goal is to get stories you submit promoted to the homepage, the Digg user you just spied on might be a good friend to have.
Spotting the crap
With Digg Spy you can see which stories are being buried in real time. If you leave Digg Spy open for 30 or so minutes you can spot a pattern of which stories users feel are crap. This is a great way to learn what not to submit.
Hot topics
With hundreds of stories hitting the homepage on a weekly basis sometimes it is hard to figure out what Digg users like. Yes, we all know Digg users like Google and hate Microsoft, but what about the other less common topics that they love such as [Ubuntu](http://www.ubuntu.com/). Digg Spy can help you notice more patterns like this which can help improve your odds of success when you submit a story.
There are many other ways to get this information from Digg, but Digg Spy is a quick and easy way. Give it a try and dig deep into it, you might be surprised at the kind of information you can learn by spying.

 Spying on Digg
Neil Patel is the co-founder of KISSmetrics, an analytics provider that helps companies make better business decisions. Neil also blogs about marketing and entrepreneurship at Quick Sprout.

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6 thoughts on “Spying on Digg

  1. I honestly still find Digg useless, even when submitting stories which in theory are the kind of content Digg users would like.
    Unless you have an established network of friends, or nudge a few people directly to take a look at a story you submitted, the chances of it going anywhere are slim.
    As an example one story I submitted recently.
    “Mac User “Drop Microsoft From My Life” New Year Resolution”
    I submitted it because I thought it was good.
    No Diggs
    It seems the only thing that really matters on Digg are friends and influence, not the story content until it is already making waves.

  2. Andy, you can still get to the homepage without any friends. Just try a little harder on the content front. If you spend 20 hours writing a good content piece there is a good chance it will make it.