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New Ask.com Commercial : Ask 3D & The Algorithm

Ask.com rolled out its new ‘Ask 3D’ interface yesterday and has followed it up with a new commercial which was posted to YouTube by Michael Arrington of TechCrunch.

The new commercial is somewhat inline with the controversial and somewhat offensive Ask.com advertising campaign which pushes its Algorthim, but is more down to earth and on the human level, perhaps showing that Ask.com is going to stop using obscure and somewhat offensive material in their promotional pieces.

Now, they’ve settled down to using ‘chicks with swords.’



The commercial is catchy and very Busby Berkeley inspired, bringing back memories of other Busby inspired pieces, like this scene from the Big Lebowski.

Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM New Ask.com Commercial : Ask 3D & The Algorithm
Loren Baker is the Founder of SEJ, an Advisor at Alpha Brand Media and runs Foundation Digital, a digital marketing strategy & development agency.
Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM New Ask.com Commercial : Ask 3D & The Algorithm

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4 thoughts on “New Ask.com Commercial : Ask 3D & The Algorithm

  1. Nice analogy.

    I hated the commercial at first – too pervy, but the more I thought about it the more I realized they’ve got something. The song is catchy and repetitive, so you’ll remember the commercial while zoning out at work and then talk about how annoying it was with coworkers. From there it’s a short leap to see if someone can really find what they are looking for and hopefully they won’t be let down. I think they were also smart in appealing to white, middle-aged, dorky men – who are more likely to be early adopters and influence future users.

  2. I’m curious why they they didn’t use ‘what I am asking for’ instead of ‘what I am looking for.’

    The Ask name lends itself to be used so much more than they seem to use it. Why Google something when you can Ask for it? I’m surprised they don’t get their name into some seemingly obvious places in their advertising.

  3. Ask.com makes me more confused about its marketing message, are trying to mass-target searchers or what. Before their ads were about librarians, next scientists, now sex addicted people.