Social Media

Don't forget to learn from your Diggs

[Chris Hooley](http://www.chris-hooley.com/) and I were talking today and we both noticed that [Market Wire](http://www.marketwire.com/) has been spamming Digg for almost 200 days. They have [submitted](http://digg.com/users/marketwire/news/submitted) over 300 press releases to Digg from their own Digg account in an attempt to get their press releases more attention.
marketwiredigg Don't forget to learn from your Diggs
With all of these submissions and no homepage Diggs you would think that they would have gotten the message that diggers don’t really care for press releases. I can understand why they submitted the press releases to Digg, but if it were me I would have at least learned my lesson after a few submissions. If you can’t get a homepager within your first 30 submissions you usually want to analyze what you are doing, modify your approach, and then try again.
Hopefully Digg will check into this because users like these are eventually going to degrade the quality of Digg. The good news is the community is smart enough to notice that the submissions are junk so that they do not end up reaching the homepage. The bad news is URLs like marketwire.com are not getting banned while [other URLs](http://www.themulife.com/?p=554) with much better content are.
Have you noticed any Digg spam, or [MFDs](http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/the-rise-of-made-for-digg-websites.html) lately?

 Don't forget to learn from your Diggs
Neil Patel is the co-founder of KISSmetrics, an analytics provider that helps companies make better business decisions. Neil also blogs about marketing and entrepreneurship at Quick Sprout.

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4 thoughts on “Don't forget to learn from your Diggs

  1. They’re obviously just doing it to increase their search engine rankings. They don’t care if they make the home page. A link is still a link.

  2. Like Jonah said before me, they want to boost their rankings. An extra link helps out, and 300 extra links helps out even more. Also, 300 days of a few extra visitors probably helps out much better than getting one lucky story on the front page- getting on the front page creates a big spike, but wont give you a hundred new regulars.
    Long story short, if getting on the Digg front page is your main source of traffic, you need to explore new ideas. The “long tail” is very true in the blogosphere, and it’s the most important part of the Digg Effect- how many return visitors you get.

  3. Great post as always Neil – I wonder if I can talk you into a guest post on CN? :)
    I just took your post one step further… Click my name to check it out.. the title is “Will Digg follow by going nofollow”.