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Cracking the Digg.com Algorithm

Yesterday we looked at the new changes to the Digg.com algorithm which makes it more difficult for stories to make it to the Digg front page, essentially filtering out the unqualified Diggs and adding more value to the overall Digg.com experience.

Today Cristian Mezei digs a bit deeper into the new Digging system and how the rapidity of votes, rank of Diggers, number of comments, and the number of buries all may play an important role to figuring out a story’s DiggRank.

As noted yesterday by Neil Patel, stories submitted to some categories may endure more difficulty making it to the Digg homepage than others.

Going a bit further, Cristian makes an effort in breaking down the average number of Diggs needed for a story to make it to the Digg.com front page:

Number of diggs you need to get on the frontpage, for each category:

* Technology (and the sub-categories) – about 50 diggs required, but it may go up to 90.
* Science (and the sub-categories) – about 65-70 diggs required, but it may go up to 85.
* World & Business (and the sub-categories) – about 80-90 diggs required, but it may go up to 100.

* Sports (and the sub-categories) – about 30-40 diggs required, but it may go up to 50.
* Videos (and the sub-categories) – about 55-60 diggs required, but it may go up to 80.
* Entertainment (and the sub-categories) – about 50-55 diggs required, but it may go up to 70.

* Gaming (and the sub-categories) – about 35-50 diggs required, but it may go up to 60.

Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM Cracking the Digg.com Algorithm
Loren Baker is the Founder of SEJ, an Advisor at Alpha Brand Media and runs Foundation Digital, a digital marketing strategy & development agency.
Screen Shot 2014 04 15 at 7.21.12 AM Cracking the Digg.com Algorithm

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